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Taking the Road for Play

Cyclist Appropriations of Automobile Infrastructures in Vietnam

Ashley Carruthers

After declining in status and mode share sharply with the popularization of the motorcycle, cycling in Vietnam is on the rise. Urban elites who pursue sport and leisure cycling are the most visible of Vietnam’s new cyclists, and they bring their sense of social mastery out onto the road with them by appropriating the nation’s new, automobile-focused infrastructures as places for play and display. While motivated by self-interest, their informal activism around securing bicycle access to new bridges and highways potentially benefits all and contributes to making livable cities. These socially elite cyclists transcend the status associated with their means of mobility as they enact their mastery over automobile infrastructures meant to usher in a new Vietnamese automobility.

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The Role of Cycle Rickshaws in Urban Transport

Today and Tomorrow

Geetam Tiwari

Cycle rickshaws continue to play an important role in meeting the mobility demands in South Asian cities. Current transport policies, however, do not support their use. Rickshaws are viewed as a cause of congestion and a profession in which rickshaw owners exploit poor people. This article presents data from published studies to argue against those views. Data from Delhi metro users suggests that as cities expand their public transport services, rickshaws will continue as an important feeder mode in the future. Recent studies also suggest that if separate lanes are created for non-motorized vehicles (which can be used by bicycles as well), then rickshaws and motorized vehicles will experience less congestion and non-motorized vehicles will be exposed to lower traffic crash risk. This article advocates the collection of relevant data concerning rickshaw trips and the number of rickshaws in future travel surveys and that appropriate infrastructures should be designed to facilitate their movement.

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Book Reviews

Mari Hvattum, Brita Brenna, Beate Elvebakk and Janike Kampevold Larsen, eds., Routes, Roads and Landscapes Kevin James

Joe T. Darden and Richard W. Thomas, Detroit: Race Riots, Racial Conflicts, and Efforts to Bridge the Racial Divide Bruce Pietrykowski

Adria Imada, Aloha America: Hula Circuits through the U.S. Empire Chase Smith

Noel B. Salazar, Envisioning Eden: Mobilizing Imaginaries in Tourism and Beyond Julia Harrison

Leon Fink, Sweatshops at Sea: Merchant Seamen in the World's First Globalized Industry, from 1812 to the Present John T. Grider

Diana Glenn, Eric Bouvet and Sonia Floriani, eds., Imagining Home: Migrants and the Search for a New Belonging Irene Belperio

Thomas Birtchnell, Indovation: Innovation and a Global Knowledge Economy in India Kevin Hannam

Giuseppina Pellegrino, ed., The Politics of Proximity Jonas De Vos and Frank Witlox

John Parkin, ed., Cycling and Sustainability Manuel Stoffers

Luis Vivanco, Reconsidering the Bicycle: An Anthropological Perspective on a New (Old) Thing Matthew Calarco

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Ovarian Psycos

An Urban Cadence of Power and Precarity

Jennifer Ruth Hosek

Ovarian Psycos (2016) enters working-class Latina culture in East Los Angeles. Seventy-two minutes offer an intimate engagement with the Ovarian Psycos Bicycle Brigade, especially three protagonists, longtime member Xela, daughter Yoli, and newcomer Evie

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Book Reviews

Manuel Stoffers, Blake Morris, Alan Meyer, Younes Saramifar, Andrew Cobbing, Martin Emanuel, Rudi Volti, Caitlin Starr Cohn, Caitríona Leahy, and Sunny Stalter-Pace

Contributions to the Policy Turn in Cycling History Bruce D. Epperson, Bicycles in American Highway Planning: The Critical Years of Policy-Making 1969–1991 (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, 2014), 248 pp., $45 Carlton Reid, Roads Were

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The Transformation of Urban Mobility Practices in Maastricht (1950–1980)

Coevolution of Cycling and Car Mobility

Marc Dijk, Anique Hommels, and Manuel Stoffers

Section 1: Introduction: Histories of Cycling and Car Mobility in Cities Between World War I and the late 1950s, the bicycle was omnipresent on public roads in many parts of the Western world outside the US. 1 Thereafter, cycling diminished

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Editorial

Mimi Sheller and Gijs Mom

, thereby building on existing literature in each respective field but also opening new research questions. Thus, each article offers creative ways to address practices such as bicycling, music performances, migration, or gender relations in new ways. And

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Editorial

Gijs Mom

and redefinitions of what it means to be mobile, either in a bus, in a car, or on a bicycle, or through a cell phone, a game, or the Internet, or, for that matter, in just a dangerous situation, as the current issue will testify. These reformulations

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Book Reviews

Eirini Kasioumi, Anna Plyushteva, Talya Zemach-Bersin, Kathleen F. Oswald, Molly Sauter, Alexandra Ganser, Mustafa Ahmed Khan, Natasha Raheja, Harry Oosterhuis, and Benjamin Fraser

Margaret Guroff, The Mechanical Horse: How the Bicycle Reshaped American Life (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2016), 295 pp., 10 black-and-white photographs, 5 black-and-white illustrations, $17.95 (paperback) Melody L. Hoffmann, Bike Lanes Are

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Book Reviews

Michael K. Bess, David Lipset, Kudzai Matereke, Stève Bernardin, Katharine Bartsch, Harry Oosterhuis, Samuel Müller, Frank Schipper, Benjamin D’Harlingue, and Katherine Roeder

developing underground mobility in Rome (263). The chapters of the fourth part of the book focus on interest groups. Wulf-hard Stahl insists on some tensions within an intellectual elite regarding the status of bicycles in the public space in Germany around