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Henry Miller Travels in Greece

Leonidas Sotiropoulos and

When Henry Miller left Paris in the summer of 1939 (July 14) and set foot in Greece, Europe was, in Winston Churchill’s words (1971, 341–358), “on the verge” of war. Within weeks of his arrival (mid-August) on the island of Corfu at the house of

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Temporal Vertigo and Time Vortices on Greece’s Central Plain

Daniel M. Knight

Introduction ‘Have you ever seen that programme Star Trek ?’ Despoina asks me as we walk through the weekly market in the centre of Trikala, a town on the central plains of mainland Greece. ‘I remember as a child’, she nudges me in the side

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The Poetics of Anti-Americanism in Greece

Rhetoric, Agency, and Local Meaning

Elisabeth Kirtsoglou and Dimitrios Theodossopoulos

In this article we examine the content and rationale of anti-Americanism in Greece, drawing ethnographic information from two urban centers, Patras and Volos. We pay special attention to the conspiracy theory attributes of this rhetoric, and, instead of dismissing it or seeing it primarily as a manifestation of nationalist thinking, we attempt to unpack the threads of meaning that make it so appealing in local contexts. We look in particular at the etiology of blame within this particular discourse and try to explain the specific readings of history and politics that make it significant in local contexts. We argue that Greek anti-Americanism has an empowering potential for local actors, as it provides them with a certain degree of discursive agency over wider political processes that are beyond their immediate control.

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Stretching Money to Pay the Bills

Temporal Modalities and Relational Practices of ‘Getting By’ in the Greek Economic Crisis

Andreas Streinzer

Ενοικιάζεται! is written on hundreds of red and yellow stickers announcing the slowing down of consumption rhythms in Volos, a town in Thessaly, east central Greece. Ενοικιάζεται means ‘for rent’, and in some streets every third shop is

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The Material Life of War at the Greek Border

Laurie Kain Hart

effects made visible in the material-infrastructural world. The presence of scores of abandoned but architecturally impressive buildings in the border zone landscape of the Prespa Lakes in northwest Greek Macedonia puzzled me on my first visit in 1993. The

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A Contemplative Approach in the Framework of Environmental Education

The Potential of Mindfulness

Irida Tsevreni

with undergraduate students of a Pedagogical Department at a university in Greece, who experimented with mindfulness techniques in natural places. The research attempts to investigate what kind of effects the mindfulness techniques had on participants

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Between Dreams and Traces

Memory, Temporality, and the Production of Sainthood in Lesbos

Séverine Rey

The monastery Agios (‘saint’ in Greek) Rafaïl was built in the 1960s on the northern Aegean island of Lesbos in Greece. Over the span of a few decades, it has become a well-known Orthodox Christian shrine that attracts many devotees and pilgrims

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Our Present Misfortune

Games and the Post-Bureaucratic Colonization of Contingency

Thomas M. Malaby

Anthropology is turning toward a new engagement with a central question of Weber: how do people come to understand the distribution of fortune in the world? Our discipline's recent examination of the uses of the past prompts us to ask how stances toward the future are both the product of cultural logics and the target of institutional interests. In this article, I trace the engagement with contingency in anthropology and social thought, and then compare the nonchalant stance toward the future found in Greek society with the different disposition of individual gaming mastery in the digital domain, such as in Second Life, but also in the longest-running Greek state-sponsored game: Pro-Po. These examples illustrate how games are increasingly the sites for institutional efforts both to appropriate creativity and to generate distinctive subjectivities.

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The Currency of Proof

Euro Competence and the Refiguring of Value in Greece

Thomas M. Malaby

The rollout of the euro as a hard currency involved unprecedented logistical organization oriented toward security; yet just as central to its success was the pedagogical project of enlisting those within the euro-zone to be competent with the new currency. This paper explores two forms of euro competence in Greece: the accurate recognition and use of the currency, and the learned refiguring of the values of everyday products. These competencies were, however, only partially anticipated and targeted by the institutions involved in the rollout; in key respects these competencies were generated by the rollout event itself. These competencies can furthermore be seen as epistemic practices; they came to serve as the grounds for truths about the monetary system itself, about Greeks as Europeans, and about the morality of economic transactions.

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Nikandros Noukios, a Greek Traveller in Midsixteenth Century Europe

Maria Kostaridou

In the spring of 1952, the Greek poet George Seferis, then acting as a counsellor at the Greek Embassy in London, gave a brief talk on BBC Radio on 'A Greek in the England of 1545' (Seferis 1981).1 The Greek of the title was Nikandros Noukios, a native of Corfu and resident of Venice, who, in the middle of the sixteenth century, travelled extensively in Europe, eventually crossing the English Channel and reaching the British Isles. Rather unusually, he also left behind a three-volume narrative of his travels, entitled Apodemiai.