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Working Hard, Hanging Back

Constructing the Achieving Girl

Colette Slagle

reception analysis. Paule begins the book by tracing a history of genius as a concept, illustrating the ways in which girls have been excluded consistently from this category. She begins with the Ancient Greeks and traces it through the Romantics, showing

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Thebes Troutman as Traveling Tween

Revising the Family Story

Margaret Steffler

) and suggests that it will need to be cut off. Steven Connor, in The Book of Skin , points out that skin “in classical Greek culture … was regarded as a kind of excrescence, which could protect the integrity of the body precisely because it was not

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You Haven't Seen the Last of Men

The Full Monty (Peter Cattaneo, 1997)

Julie Michot

suddenly start swinging to the rhythm of “Hot Stuff” by Donna Summer (52:35), means that they all want to act and carry out their project: “The radio playing [the song] … becomes a technological Greek chorus,” pushing “Gaz and his mates to react to their

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Sexual Consent and the Adolescent Male, or What Can We Learn from the Greeks?

Thomas K. Hubbard

Classical Athens offers a useful comparative test‐case for essentialist assumptions about the necessary harm that emanates from sexual intimacy between adults and adolescent boys. The Athenian model does not fit victimological expectations, but instead suggests that adolescent boys could be credited with considerable powers of discretion and responsibility in sexual matters without harming their future cultural productivity. Contemporary American legislation premised on children’s incapacity to “consent” to sexual relations stems from outmoded gender constructions and ideological preoccupations of the late Victorian and Progressive Era; that it has been extended to “protection” of boys is a matter of historical accident, rather than sound social policy. Rigorous social science and historical comparanda suggest that we should consider a different “age of consent” for boys and girls.

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Shakespeare's "Boys"

Miles Groth

Shakespeare was keenly affected by the lives of the boys who played the parts of women in his plays. Evidence for his understanding and compassion is found in the speeches of those characters who cross-dress female to male. By a double negation of his gender, the boy actor is given an opportunity to speak for himself as well for the female character he is portraying. The examples are Julia as Sebastian in The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Portia as Balthazar and Nerissa as both the young lawyer’s clerk and Jessica in The Merchant of Venice, Viola as Cesario in Twelfth Night, Imogen as Fidele in Cymbeline, and especially Rosalind as Ganymede in As You Like It. I argue that what they were given to say by Shakespeare reveals the experience of being a boy, not only in early modern England or ancient Greece (where all parts were also played by males), but also in our time. I suggest the treatment of boys in the theatre is mirrored by the treatment of boys today. In those instances where doubled impersonation was written into Shakespeare’s plays, we have a unique opportunity to hear boys tell us about themselves. As with so much else that is timeless insight, the bard understood and articulated the experience of being a boy. Taken together, the utterances of his “boys” tell us how it is to be a boy.

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From Boy to Man in Antiquity

Jesus in the Apocryphal Infancy Gospel of Thomas

Reidar Aasgaard

This article presents a survey of research on childhood in antiquity and describes briefly the position of children in late antiquity and early Christianity. Special attention is given to the relationship between childhood and gender, with a focus on boyhood. The article analyses the apocryphal Infancy Gospel of Thomas, which tells the childhood story of Jesus from age five to twelve. This brief story, which consists of miracle stories and discourses, originated in Greek in the 2nd century CE and became widely popular. The article shows that its depiction of Jesus conforms to current ideas of gender, gender relations, and gender socialisation. A central claim in the article is that boys were not expected to show the same degree of self-restraint as were adult males, but that as children they were allowed to behave more emotionally and unpredictably. Rather than being literarily inferior or theologically aberrant, the Infancy of Gospel of Thomas in its depiction of Jesus gives a lively and credible glimpse into the world and development of a late antiquity or early Christianity male child on his way from boyhood to male adult life.

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About the Cover

Andrew J. Ball and Aleksandr Rybin

. Religion had a huge impact on ancient culture, one element of which was ancient Greek mythology. From mythology we learn about the historical events of that time, about the life of society and its problems. Also in the old days the church was one of the few

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Being Screens, Making Screens

Functions and Technical Objects

Mauro Carbone, Graziano Lingua, and Sarah De Sanctis

differentiation between the various historical-cultural configurations that have been gradually taken on by the related screen experiences. In fact, the “arche-screen” should be understood as a (musical) theme—or, according to the meaning of the Greek archˉe

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An Appreciation of the Ethnographic in Connell's The Men and the Boys

Marcus B. Weaver-Hightower

how Connell conveys complexity without artifices like postmodern parentheticals, seventy-seven-word sentences, and tautologies of Latin and Greek terms. Second, perhaps more importantly, I now notice Connell's talent as a methodologist. She may

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Masculinity, Fun, and Social Change

Reflections on The Men and the Boys

C.J. Pascoe

During the mid ’90s, I found myself, a college senior in Boston, visiting a friend in California at his fraternity house. I spent a week growing increasingly intrigued, as someone who attended a college with no official Greek life, watching early