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Henry Miller Travels in Greece

Leonidas Sotiropoulos and

When Henry Miller left Paris in the summer of 1939 (July 14) and set foot in Greece, Europe was, in Winston Churchill’s words (1971, 341–358), “on the verge” of war. Within weeks of his arrival (mid-August) on the island of Corfu at the house of

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Senses and Gender in Modern and Ancient Greek Healing Rituals

Evy Johanne Håland

This article is based on a larger ongoing project, The Dangerous Life: Gender, Pain, Health and Healing in Modern and Ancient Greece, a Comparison , which presents a method new to the study of antiquity: ethnographic fieldwork combined with

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Were There Better Angels of a Classical Greek Nature?

Violence in Classical Athens

Matthew Trundle

Steven Pinker discusses ancient Greek civilization only briefly at the beginning of his work, and simply to highlight the violence of heroes such as Achilles and Odysseus depicted in the Homeric poems. How do Pinker’s ideas relate to violence in

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Nikandros Noukios, a Greek Traveller in Midsixteenth Century Europe

Maria Kostaridou

In the spring of 1952, the Greek poet George Seferis, then acting as a counsellor at the Greek Embassy in London, gave a brief talk on BBC Radio on 'A Greek in the England of 1545' (Seferis 1981).1 The Greek of the title was Nikandros Noukios, a native of Corfu and resident of Venice, who, in the middle of the sixteenth century, travelled extensively in Europe, eventually crossing the English Channel and reaching the British Isles. Rather unusually, he also left behind a three-volume narrative of his travels, entitled Apodemiai.

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Walking to Write

Following Patrick Leigh Fermor across Europe

David Wills

Hook of Holland to the Golden Horn (London: Nicholas Brealey, 2014), 330 pp. ISBN: 978-1-85788-617-7, $17.95 (paperback). There have been many literary tributes to the celebrated British traveler, writer, and war hero of Nazi-occupied Greece, Sir

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Particularities of Greek Travel Writing in a Balkan and European Context

Annita Panaretou

Under this rubric, Journeys presents Dr Annita Panaretou's assessment of the character of Greek travel writing and its place in a wider Balkan and European context, and a discussion of her position by three other scholars. The debate raises questions that go well beyond the immediate problem posed by the Greek case. What are the roles of history, ideology and emotion in the construction of identities? How does travel writing serve as a site in which these can be expressed, constructed and negotiated? And how, in the light of such issues, should we study particular national travel-writing traditions?

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Nathaniel Lee's Politics of Sovereignty

Aspasia Velissariou

Abstract

This article explores the chaotic violence in Nathaniel Lee's tragedies, which, while clearly originating in the sovereign, by its sheer excess and blindness, is hypostasised as a motor of history. In Lee, violence is a reflection of the political anxieties surrounding the Exclusion Crisis but it is also intrinsic to the way he understands the nature of political life; in reality, it is constitutive of the very exercise of power. Drawing on Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer I argue that sovereign violence is inscribed in a most savage form as the very foundation of the civil community, and, therefore, its autonomisation, as in Lee's early plays, is only apparent. In Lucius Junius Brutus: Father of His Country (1680) the extreme sovereign assault on human life fully discloses its politically defined character because it is emblematically performed in the name of the institution of a new body politic, the Republic.

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[I] ‘did write this Wyll with my own hand’

Simulation and Dissimulation in Isabella Whitney’s ‘Wyll and Testament’

Vassiliki Markidou

Abstract

This article attempts for the first time to shed light on the politics of simulation and dissimulation in Isabella Whitney's ‘Wyll and Testament’. It also argues that the poem both reflects its creator's awareness of the celebrated English historical and topographical narratives and deviates from them by crucially omitting a seminal part of London's history, namely its Troynovant tradition. In so doing, as well as by defining a paradoxical urban landscape, Whitney presents a tale not of the (mythic) founding of the English capital with its patriarchal and nation-building connotations, but of its (satiric) bequeathal by benevolent femininity, as such offering its reader a different angle from which to explore and interpret early modern London.

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The Naming of a Way of Life

Romaic V. Greek

Manos Georginis

In this essay I intend to define and clarify the terms Romios/Romaic/ Romiossini, Greek/Greekness/Greece, and Hellenic/Hellas, which very often confuse readers of Greek literature in translation. I will consider the use of these words in the poetry of Yannis Ritsos and in some anthologies of Greek poetry in translation. In my examination of the different usages of these terms, I will inevitably turn to history and draw distinctions between the Greek Orthodox East and the Christian West, sometimes expressing strong opinions.

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Book Reviews

Amy Cox Hall, Sergio González Varela, Jessica S.R. Robinson, Peter Weisensel, and David Wills

more thorough and convincing explanation. Peter Weisensel Macalester College Efterpi Mitsi . Greece in Early English Travel Writing, 1596–1682 (NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), x + 206 pp., ISBN: 978-3-319-62611-6, £74.99 (hardcover). The