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Looking for the Way Out

The Attribution of Treatment Responsibility among Greek and German Actors in the Eurozone Crisis Debate

Jochen Roose, Moritz Sommer, and Maria Kousis

Introduction In a Eurogroup meeting in October 2009, the new Greek minister of finance, George Papaconstantinou, revealed that the Greek public debt was much higher than previously stated. The Greek state was unable to cover the increasing

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Senses and Gender in Modern and Ancient Greek Healing Rituals

Evy Johanne Håland

This article is based on a larger ongoing project, The Dangerous Life: Gender, Pain, Health and Healing in Modern and Ancient Greece, a Comparison , which presents a method new to the study of antiquity: ethnographic fieldwork combined with

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The German Mountain Troops and Their Opponents, 1943 to the Present

Nathan Stoltzfus

The most significant World War II struggle between German and Italian troops outside of Italy was the September 1943 battle for the Greek Ionian island of Cephalonia, occupied jointly after 1940 by Italian and German troops. When the post

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“The Fourth Reich Is Here”

An Exploration of Populist Depictions of the European Union as a German Plot to Take Over Europe

Julian Pänke

representative of a particular periphery: Greece for the South, Poland for the East, and Great Britain as opting-out. The article concludes that the challenges for German leadership are likely to remain and therefore Germany needs strong partners prone to a more

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Were There Better Angels of a Classical Greek Nature?

Violence in Classical Athens

Matthew Trundle

Steven Pinker discusses ancient Greek civilization only briefly at the beginning of his work, and simply to highlight the violence of heroes such as Achilles and Odysseus depicted in the Homeric poems. How do Pinker’s ideas relate to violence in

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The Bureaucratic Politics of Germany’s First Greek Bailout Package

Luke B. Wood

which to build analyses of policy production in contemporary Germany. Although much scholarly work explores the second Merkel government’s policy towards Greece, little effort is spent analyzing decision-making processes within the federal government

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This Is the Time of Tension

Collective Action and Subjective Power in the Greek Anti-Austerity Movement

Atalanti Evripidou and John Drury

Greece has been one of the countries which most severely suffered the consequences of the global economic crisis during the past two years. It has also been a country with a long tradition of protest. The present paper reports a study in which we examined the ways in which people talk about subjective power and deal with the outcome of collective action in the context of defeat. Subjective power has recently become a prominent field of research and its link to collective action has been studied mainly through the concept of collective efficacy. The current study explored questions based on recent social identity accounts of subjective power in collective action. We examined participants’ experiences of subjective power before and after Mayday 2012, in Greece. Two different collective action events took place: a demonstration against austerity and a demonstration to support steel workers who were on strike. In total, 19 people were interviewed, 9 before the demonstrations and 10 after. Thematic analysis was carried out. Protest participants talked about power in terms of five first-order themes: the necessity of building power, unity, emotional effects, effects of (dis)organization, and support as success. The steel workers we spoke to experienced the events more positively than the other interviewees and had different criteria for success. Theories of collective action need to take account of the fact that subjective power has important emotional as well as cognitive dimensions, and that definitions of success depend on definitions of identity.

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Social Quality Indicators in Times of Crisis

The Case of Greece

Konstantinos G. Kougias

Chronic deficiencies of the Greek welfare state and the introduction of austerity measures as part of the international financial bailout agreements have created an explosive cocktail of poverty and social exclusion that severely tested the resilience of the frail social safety net and the demands of equity. The score on the indicators of social quality has worsened considerably as the Greek welfare system was overhauled. This article examines the four conditional factors of social quality from the viewpoint of socio-economic policies and everyday experiences in Greece during the crisis.

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Rage and Protest

The Case of the Greek Indiginant Movement

Marilena Simiti

In 2011 numerous 'Occupy' and anti-austerity protests took place across Europe and the United States. Passionate indignation at the failure of political elites became a mobilizing force against formal political institutions. In Greece a mass movement known as the Aganaktismeni (the Indignant) became the main agent of social resistance to the memorandum signed by the Greek government, the European Union and the International Monetary Fund. The Greek movement did not take the form of a social movement sharing a collective identity. Left-wing protestors played a prominent role. Protestors embracing right-wing populist frames also participated actively in collective mobilizations, while segments of the extreme right attempted to manipulate rage to their advantage. During the Greek Indignant movement civil society remained a terrain contested by conflicting political forces. This unique feature of the Greek movement posed a completely different challenge to the principles of diversity and inclusiveness than the one debated within the Spanish Indignados and the Occupy protests. Furthermore, it illustrates that rage and indignation may spark dissimilar forms of political contention. Hence, rage and indignation do not merely motivate ‘passive citizens’ to participate in collective protest. They are linked to cognitive frames and individual preferences, which influence protestors’ claims and mobilizations’ political outcomes. Accordingly, advances in democratization and inclusive citizenship are only one of the possible outcomes of mobilizations prompted by rage and indignation.

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A Contemplative Approach in the Framework of Environmental Education

The Potential of Mindfulness

Irida Tsevreni

with undergraduate students of a Pedagogical Department at a university in Greece, who experimented with mindfulness techniques in natural places. The research attempts to investigate what kind of effects the mindfulness techniques had on participants