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Educational Persistence in the Face of Violence

Narratives of Resilient Latino Male Youth

Adrian H. Huerta

Latino boys and young men often carry the debt of violence into different spaces. This invisible trauma manifests into disruptive behaviors in schools. It is well documented that violence in urban communities and schools has received significant attention from researchers, but little attention has been paid to Latino male youth as individuals and the various forms of violence they have experienced, and how that impacts educational persistence. This qualitative study focuses on 26 Latino male middle and high school students who are attending two continuation schools to understand the types of violence they have experienced and their educational aspirations after high school.

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Constructing Pathways to Responsible Manhood

Controlling Images and Meaning Making Through the Use of Counter-narratives

Mellie Torres, Alejandro E. Carrión, and Roberto Martínez

responsibility. The present study explores how Latino boys who participated in the Black and Latino Male School Intervention Study (BLMSIS) understood and made sense of manhood and their masculinities. These students attended small, all-male public schools that

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School-Imposed Labeling and the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Symbolic Violence on the Bodies of Boys of Color in One “No Excuses” Charter School

L. Trenton S. Marsh

Historical, socially constructed notions of Black and Latino masculinity, mis/labeled behavior, punitive policies (e.g., suspension) and practices (e.g., school-imposed labeling) lead to disproportionate rates of dropout in urban US schools, continued involvement in the criminal legal system, and a limited participation in society. This article argues that school-imposed labeling—affixing a category or descriptor on a student to signal a shorthand message to others about a student’s academic ability and behavior—is symbolically violent (Bourdieu). By examining unofficial labels, punitive structures, and teacher perceptions of labeled students, I explored school-imposed labeling as a form of “normalized” practice that impacts Black and Latino males who attend an urban charter school with a “no excuses” orientation.

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Introduction

Masculinity and Boyhood Constructions in the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Edward Fergus and Juwan Bennett

The conversation on the school-to-prison pipeline among boys of color is complex and involves understanding how the 4 C’s— classroom, cops, courts, and community— interface to create a pipeline. However, what has been underconceptualized is whether and how notions of masculinity and boyhood that emerge within these institutions may operate as an invisible connective tissue across these institutions. In other words, the manner in which the bodies of Black and Latino males are viewed, interacted with, and treated within these institutions provides a rationalizing frame for how the actions within institutions occur. In this special issue, we theorize that, to understand the ways in which the school-to-prison pipeline operates for boys of color, there needs to be theoretical exploration through empirical work of what notions of masculinity are promoted and detracted within these institutions during boyhood. This interdisciplinary special issue of Boyhood Studies provides a conceptual exploration of how male bodies of color are constructed within and across these institutions, e.g., suspensions (schools), arrests (police), sentencing (courts), and violence (communities) in order to establish the pipeline as concretized through “normative” or oppressive notions of masculinity and boyhood.

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Editorial

Michael R. M. Ward

notion of counter-storytelling from critical race theory to explore ways Latino boys try to reframe masculinity, manhood, and what they label as “responsible manhood.” Data are drawn from the Black and Latino Male School Intervention Study (BLMSIS

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“We Had to Stick Together”

Black Boys, the Urban Neighborhood Context, and Educational Aspirations

Derrick Brooms

many Latino male youths in the study who drew on male peer ties for protection from urban violence got “caught up” in behaviors counterproductive to school completion (e.g., being truant or helping friends in a fight). Rendón found some of these young

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Conditional Freedom

A Portrait of Young Men's Sense of Belonging to the Street in Maputo, Mozambique

Andrea Moreira

Books . Rios , Victor , and Cesar Rodriguez . 2012 . “ Incarcerable Subjects: Working-Class Black and Latino Male Youths in Two California Cities .” In Young Men in Uncertain Times , ed. Vered Amit and Noel Dyck , 241 – 264 . Oxford