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Ka’ux

Mixe language and biodiversity loss in Oaxaca, Mexico

Alfonsina Arriaga-Jiménez, Citlali Pérez-Díaz, and Sebastian Pillitteri

English abstract: The community of Tlahuitoltepec, in the Sierra Mixe of Oaxaca, is losing Traditional Ecological Knowledge due to socially driven changes in its natural environment. Mixe is one of the 69 indigenous languages spoken in Oaxaca, and is spoken almost exclusively in Tlahuitoltepec. Using an ethnographic approach, with loosely structured interviews among key members of the community, we analyzed the theory that biodiversity loss is linked to the loss of indigenous languages and traditional ecological knowledge. Our findings show that certain words in Mixe, used to refer to animals that are no longer observed in the community or its surroundings, are not well known by young people. The case of Ka’ux reflects what happens to traditional ecological knowledge and to an indigenous language when biodiversity is lost.

Spanish abstract: La comunidad de Tlahuitoltepec, en la Sierra Mixe de Oaxaca, pierde conocimiento ecológico tradicional debido a cambios sociales en su ambiente natural. El Mixe es una de las 69 lenguas indígenas habladas en Oaxaca, y es hablado casi exclusivamente en Tlahiutoltepec. Aplicando un enfoque etnográfico, con entrevistas semiestructuradas a miembros clave de la comunidad, analizamos la teoría sobre si la pérdida de biodiversidad se relaciona con la pérdida de lenguas indígenas y conocimiento ecológico tradicional. Nuestros resultados muestran que algunas palabras mixes usadas para nombrar animales que ya no se observan en la comunidad o sus alrededores, no son bien conocidas por la gente joven. El caso de Ka’ux refleja que ocurre con el conocimiento ecológico tradicional y a las lenguas indígenas cuando la biodiversidad desaparece.

French abstract: La communauté de Tlahuitoltepec, dans la Sierra mixe d’Oaxaca, perd ses connaissances écologiques traditionnelles en raison de changements sociaux dans son environnement naturel. Le mixe est l’une des soixante-neuf langues indigènes parlées à Oaxaca et elle est parlée presque exclusivement à Tlahuitoltepec. En utilisant une approche ethnographique, avec des entretiens semi-structurés parmi les membres clés de la communauté, nous avons analysé la théorie selon laquelle la biodiversité est liée à la perte des langues autochtones et des connaissances écologiques traditionnelles. Nos résultats montrent que certains mots en mixe utilisés pour désigner des animaux qui ne sont plus observés dans la communauté ou ses environs ne sont pas bien connus des jeunes. Le cas de Ka’ux reflète l’impact de la perte de biodiversité sur les connaissances écologiques traditionnelles et sur une langue autochtone.

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M. Guadalupe Torres-Jiménez, Rene Murrieta-Galindo, Beatriz Bolívar-Cimé, Astrid Wojtarowski-Leal, and M. Ángeles Piñar-Álvarez

, 2011 ), contributing to the enlargement of global environmental problems, such as the alteration of biogeochemical cycles, global warming, environmental pollution, and loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services, particularly in agroecosystems

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Scratches on our sovereignty?

Analyzing conservation politics in the Sundarbans

Jayashree Vivekanandan

–Brahmaputra river basin carries over a billion tons of sediment load annually, four times that of all the European rivers combined ( Centre for Science and Environment, 2012 , p. 34). One of the most biodiversity rich regions in Asia, the Sundarbans was recognized

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Ecosystem integrity and policy coherence for development

Tools aimed at achieving balance as the basis for transformative development

Harlan Koff, Miguel Equihua Zamora, Carmen Maganda, and Octavio Pérez-Maqueo

development toward their protection, thus addressing climate change along with other issues, such as biodiversity, the effective use of water resources, land governance, energy, and so on? This paradigm shift that started with the “World We Want” Campaign

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Leadership for sustainability

Protecting the environment

Wanjira Mathai and Ma. del Socorro Aguilar Cucurachi

today we do not have to fight as hard as we used to because people understand the centrality of the environment in our daily lives. You do not have to tell people today that it is important to protect biodiversity. You do not have to tell people today

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Anna Mikhaylova and Vasilisa Gorochnaya

, biodiversity declines, and air pollution ( Scolozzi & Geneletti, 2012 ). Therefore, the positive agglomeration effect does not always spread to the rural area as the activities of rural households are not susceptible to the new techno-economic paradigm

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From proclamation to denial

Indigenous rights and political participation in Venezuela

Catherine Alès

Constitution. This communiqué ended by requesting once again that the national government issue a moratorium on mining activity in the south of the Orinoco in order to protect the water and forest resources of Amazonia as well as the biodiversity and ethnic