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Misreading Capital

The makings of Weber, Arendt, and Friedman

Dipankar Gupta

, many have actually made their careers, and distinguished themselves, by chipping away at pedestals to topple a master. Nowhere is this truer than of those who misread Marx's ([1867] 1974 ) Capital , along with his other works, and became famous. Such

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Temperature and Capital

Measuring the Future with Quantified Heat

Scott W. Schwartz

My iPhone tells me the temperature this Saturday will be 99°F. Is this appliance of mine making a benign assertion about sensible heat, or reifying the hypothetical future of capital by suppressing uncertainty? Both, perhaps, but the latter is far

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Constructing a Public Sphere

Materiality and Ideology

Judith Kapferer

The changing cultural and social significance of central city space generates and structures the social formations of capital today. Buildings and landmarks within the city of London are examined here as crucibles for the expression, symbolization, formation, and re-formation of the social orders of the city and the state. Here, the cultural power of state apparatuses to control and order the image and substance of capital and state is challenged by the arts of architecture and cityscape. The relation between public space and private practice is interrogated in locations such as the Square Mile, Trafalgar Square, and Hyde Park, which symbolize and concretize the social relations of the marketplace, the state, and the people. The experience of these places is iconic of the social formations of contemporary society.

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Icelandic Resource Landscapes and the State

Experiments in Energy, Capital, and Aluminium

James Maguire

early 2000s as vast capital flows enter the country. Making Liveability: Thermal Heat The view from the sixth floor of Reykjavík Energy's geologically inspired head office 8 is impressive as snow stretches towards the horizon, stencilling out

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Social Lives and Symbolic Capital

Indigenous ‘Oil Lawsuits’ as Sites of Order and Disorder Making

Veronica Davidov

can be conceptualized as the ‘social lives’ of lawsuits that go beyond the demarcated formal contours of juridical settings—how they circulate, what kind of symbolic capital they accrue that may last long after the litigations are over, what narratives

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Jakob Rigi

On 22 October 2003, Michael Khodorkovsky, the richest man in Russia and the director of Yukos, one of the largest Russian companies, was arrested at gunpoint in Novosibirsk airport and transferred to Moscow. A few months earlier, one of his deputies, Platon Lebedev, had been arrested on 3 July 2003. In the months that followed the arrest of Lebedev, the general prosecutor raided the offices of Yukos and Menatep, a major shareholder of Yukos. On 17 October 2003, Vasily Shakhnovsky, a Yukos shareholder, was detained for tax evasion. Another major shareholder, Leonid Nevzlin, was accused of conspiracy to commit murder and fled to Israel. One of Yukos’s security guards was also accused as a culprit in this conspiracy and was imprisoned. The general prosecutor subjected the company to a series of raids and restrictions that led to the decline of the value of its shares and brought it to the verge of bankruptcy by the middle of August 2004. Officially, all of these actions occurred because of Yukos’s illegal economic dealings and tax frauds, but the real reasons were that Khodorkovsky had dared to criticize publicly the president of the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin; that he had funded rival political parties; and that he had also toyed with the idea of entering politics himself and becoming a presidential candidate. Since the conflict between Yukos and the state is a good illustration of the contradictory relation between state and capital in Russia, let me give a brief description of Yukos’s history.

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Symbolic Capital

Urban Design for Tourism

Dean MacCannell

One of the larger changes of the last thirty years has been the emergence within urban planning and design of strong consideration for tourism, tourist sites, tourist decision making, and designer ideas about tourist desire. In a 1963 keynote address to a conference at Harvard, James Rouse declared Disneyland to be ‘the greatest piece of urban design in the United States today’. (Marling 1997: 170) Architecture and planning fields now incorporate theme park design elements into urban redevelopment projects throughout the United States. Security, cleanliness, aesthetic and social order and historic referentiality as found at Disney’s ‘Mainstreet USA’ are now ‘designed into’ urban infill projects and new towns in urban corridors.

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H.S. Hundley

The location of the capital of the Mongolian Empire, Kharakorum, had been lost to outsiders for centuries. In the summer of 1889, Nicholas Mikhailovich Iadrintsev, author, editor, and publisher of the newspaper Vostochnoe Obozrenie went in search of Kharakorum. As an oblastnik, Iadrintsev went on this quest to further understanding of Inner Asia's history. He quickly discovered its location in the Orkhon Valley, and the extremely significant Kultigin Stones, the first known Turkish writing of the first Turkish state. Iadrintsev's role in these discoveries and subsequent activity, are the subject of this research report.

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Istvan Adorjan

David Harvey, A brief history of neoliberalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005, 247 pp., 0-19928-327-3 (paperback).

Patrick Bond, Against the global apartheid: South Africa meets the World Bank, IMF and international finance. 2nd ed. London and New York: Zed Books, 2003. 326 pp, 1-84277-393-3 (paperback).

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Finding a Place to Sit

How Qatari Women Combine Cultural and Kinship Capital in the Home Majlis

Rehenuma Asmi

to see creative ways in which Qatari women combined forms of capital, such as cultural capital or access to higher education, with ‘kinship capital’ or access to family ties in the space of the home majlis . This is seen in the situation above, where