Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 47 items for :

  • "democratization" x
  • History of Ideology x
  • Democratization Studies x
  • Political Theory x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Facts and Norms in Democratization

Roberto Farneti

“polarization,” understood as the division of society into two substantial groups, may be the problem. To be sure, the literature on democratization considers polarization ( p ) and fractionalization ( f ) to be alternative options. Papers listing the causes of

Restricted access

Democratic Citizenship as Uruguayan Cultural Heritage

Robin Rodd

The third wave of democratization crashed early this century and has been receding since. By any number of metrics, qualitative or comparative analysis, leftist or establishment perspectives, democracy appears to be in retreat ( Brown 2015

Restricted access

Breaking New and Controversial Ground?

Democracy in ASEAN

Avery Poole

states in regard to ASEAN’s references to democracy, in the context of their domestic political circumstances. The article then examines the way in which democratization literature shapes our interpretation of ASEAN references to democracy. It also

Restricted access

Participation without Deliberation

The Crisis of Venezuelan Democracy

Nicole Curato

The legacy of Hugo Chavez is contentious. Some lament the deterioration of Venezuelan democracy from one of Latin America's most stable political systems to a populist authoritarian regime. Others celebrate Chavez's participatory project of institutionalizing structures for community-driven development, redistributing oil wealth through welfare policies, and creating a political party closely linked to mass movements. This article provides an alternative assessment of Venezuela's democratic quality by drawing on deliberative democratic theory. I argue that Chavez's participatory project is incomplete because it fails to create structures for deliberative politics. Without these mechanisms, Venezuela remains vulnerable to crises brought about by “uncivil action,” such as military coups and violent protests, making deliberation an important component in averting crises in democratizing polities.

Restricted access

The Limits of Liberal Democracy

Prospects for Democratizing Democracy

Viviana Asara

inherent to democratization processes. The present article focuses on some aspects which I think are not sufficiently elaborated by Lessenich to theoretically unearth and clarify their nodal points and to take forward some of their possible implications

Restricted access

Little Phil

Changing the Relationship between Philanthropy and Democracy?

Joshua Murchie and Jean-Paul Gagnon

funds the foundation is one person with more money versus thousands of persons with less money. Little Phil does offer a democratization of big philanthropy by structuring giving and receiving in ways that are normally out of reach for the less

Restricted access

Lest We Forget (Matter)

Posthumanism, Memory, and Exclusion

Matthew Howard

exemplify the contribution ANT and new materialism can make to the study of collective memory and, thus, the theorization of legal and political exclusion. The Democratization of Collective Memory Studies A dichotomy underpins collective memory studies. It

Restricted access

Against Analogy

Why Analogical Arguments in Support of Workplace Democracy Must Necessarily Fail

Roberto Frega

application of democratic norms to the workplace in terms of its supposed benefits, and/or its concrete feasibility. Several authors have notably contended that the democratization of the workplace can increase productivity, competitiveness, employment

Free access

Non-Western Theories of Democracy

Mark Chou and Emily Beausoleil

A conventional story is often told about democracy. It is a story that begins somewhere in the West, some millennia ago. From there, or so this telling goes, democracy spread across the continents; traversing from the familiar epicenters of Western civilization—Athens, London, Washington, Versailles—to the exotic and sometimes alien cultural landscapes in the East. The idea that such a model of democracy, based on an essentially Western set of ideals and practices, could one day become universal was perhaps unthinkable to most democrats before the twentieth century. However, today there is very little doubt that democracy on a global scale is both assured and desirable. But there should be no confusion here: this story of democratization, and the projection of democracy’s global future, is one premised on “the export of democratic institutions, developed within a particular cultural context in the West,” that has as its culmination “the end of history” and the triumph of Western liberal democracy in all corners of the globe (Lamont et al. 2015: 1).

Free access

Editorial

Jean-Paul Gagnon

political theorists committed to the democratization of the workplace to ground themselves in specifics. Instead of working through metaphor and analogy which risks treating workplaces or firms as more or less the same, Frega argues we should first take