Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 69 items for :

  • "dispositif" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Revisiting 'Resistance', 'The Peasantry' and Liberation/Development

The Case of Sandinismo in the 1980s

Sandra Langley

Discourse-based analysis continues to be thought of, in some quarters, in overgeneralizing terms. In this article, I emphasize that all instances of it do not share the same suppositions, and I demonstrate its purchase for a critical but nuanced revisiting of processes of national liberation and development. I present support for some of the conclusions that I advanced in an earlier study (Langley 2001), which examines post-1979 Sandinismo as a dispositif within modernity. Ultimately, I focus upon contrasting discourses of the literacy campaign that place Sandinismo in time and space as well as within a historical particularity. I consider how these discourses relate to the ways in which the most marginalized sectors of campesinos (peasants) fared in the context of the Sandinista project. The manner in which they had been ‘spoken’ about shaped and delimited how they ‘spoke’ and might have ‘spoken.’

Restricted access

Political Life beyond the Biopolitical?

Leonie Ansems de Vries

Michel Foucault's genealogy of the entry of life into politics provides an incisive account of the manner in which life came to be governed on the basis of its understood biological capacities and requirements. Foucault problematises biopolitics as a mode of governance through which life's potentialities are both produced and immobilised via the continuous (re)production of circulations, or the constitution of the milieu. The question is whether governance can be (dis)ordered such that this problem of biopolitical foreclosure is overcome. This problematique will be broached in this article by staging an encounter between Foucault's problematisation of biopolitical life and Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari's biophilosophy, which offers the promise of an ontological movement to think political life anew. Engaging Deleuze and Guattari's concept of the milieu, the article explores whether a shift of focus to an understanding of political life in terms of its potentialities of mobile and relational becoming within a wider play of forces can offer a viable strategy to counter the problematic foreclosure of politics to which Foucault draws attention.

Restricted access

Mêlées et démêlements familiaux autour d’une prise en charge pédopsychiatrique au Maroc

Julie Pluies

mais aussi questionnée par d’autres ( Lancy, 2012 ; Sobo, 2015 ). En choisissant d’aborder les inquiétudes liées à la manifestation de problèmes psychologiques et psychiatriques au Maroc, je me demande quels processus et dispositifs médicaux sont à l

Restricted access

L’entrée en politique des militants amérindiens en Argentine

Trajectoires, discours, avancées et limites

Maité Boullosa-Joly

en rendant les militants dépendants des dispositifs étatiques. NOTES 1 En 1985, une première loi est votée donnant des droits aux autochtones en matière d’accès à la propriété de la terre. En 1994, l’Argentine modifie sa constitution et

Restricted access

Du pays du non-dit à une libération de la parole

L'histoire comme enjeu culturel en Nouvelle-Calédonie

Frédéric Angleviel

Avant-hier, la société coloniale calédonienne refusait l'existence d'une civilisation kanake et occultait l'histoire conflictuelle de cette petite "France austral" des antipodes. Hier, le fait que l'identité kanake puisse être le pilier central de la case calédonienne était occulté par une quête patrimoniale et identitaire multiculturelle. Aujourd'hui, le centre culturel Jean-Marie Tjibaou (accords de Matignon) et la décision de mettre la civilisation kanake au centre du dispositif (accord de Nouméa), vont-il permettre l'émergence d'une "communauté de destin." L'étude de l'historiographie calédonienne illustre la difficulté de mettre en phase la théorie et les contraintes de la réalité.

Restricted access

HOW GENDERED IS THE EUROPEAN MIGRATION REGIME?

Sabine Hess

Based on a two-year ethnographic research project on the making of European migration policy, this article explores the ways in which gender is deeply inscribed in the articulations, practices, and rationalities of the new European migration regime. It focuses on the area of “anti-trafficking” policies at national and transnational levels, showing how and why an “anti-trafficking dispositif ” has been created over the last twenty years. Anti-trafficking policy, which targets women in particular, has become one of the main pillars of a restrictive, Europeanized migration and border regime. The article offers theoretical and methodological approaches to this gendering of migration policy, and asks what such a co-optation of feminist discourses and practices means for reflexive feminist cultural theory, research, and practice.

Restricted access

Where's Jessica?

Myth, Nation, and War in America's Heartland

Charles W. Brown

Discourse-based analysis continues to be thought of, in some quarters, in overgeneralizing terms. In this article, I emphasize that all instances of it do not share the same suppositions, and I demonstrate its purchase for a critical but nuanced revisiting of processes of national liberation and development. I present support for some of the conclusions that I advanced in an earlier study (Langley 2001), which examines post-1979 Sandinismo as a dispositif within modernity. Ultimately, I focus upon contrasting discourses of the literacy campaign that place Sandinismo in time and space as well as within a historical particularity. I consider how these discourses relate to the ways in which the most marginalized sectors of campesinos (peasants) fared in the context of the Sandinista project. The manner in which they had been ‘spoken’ about shaped and delimited how they ‘spoke’ and might have ‘spoken.’

Open access

To Fail at Scale!

Minimalism and Maximalism in Humanitarian Entrepreneurship

Jamie Cross and Alice Street

Abstract

Humanitarian entrepreneurs seek to do well and do good by developing goods and services that directly address the world's most intractable problems. In this article we explore the expectations built into two of their products: a point-of-care diagnostic device and a solar-powered lantern. We show how these objects materialise both a minimalist ethic of care and a maximalist commitment to universal access for health and energy. Such maximalist commitments, we propose, are fundamentally utopian. The developers of these humanitarian goods do not envision their objects as stop-gap solutions or ‘band-aids’ for entrenched systemic failures but rather as the building blocks for new kinds of universal infrastructures that are delivered through the market. We trace the work involved in scaling-up the humanitarian effects of these devices through processes of design, manufacturing and distribution. For humanitarian entrepreneurs, we argue, to fail at delivering expectations is to fail at scale.

Les entrepreneurs humanitaires cherchent à faire bien et à faire du bien en développant des biens et des services qui s'attaquent directement aux problèmes les plus insolubles du monde. Dans cet article, nous explorons les attentes intégrées dans deux de leurs produits : un dispositif de diagnostic au point de service et une lanterne à énergie solaire. Nous montrons comment ces objets matérialisent à la fois une éthique minimaliste des soins et un engagement maximaliste en faveur de l'accès universel à la santé et à l'énergie. Nous proposons que de tels engagements maximalistes sont fondamentalement utopiques. Les concepteurs de ces biens humanitaires n'envisagent pas leurs objets comme des solutions provisoires ou des « pansements » pour des défaillances systémiques bien ancrées, mais plutôt comme les éléments constitutifs de nouveaux types d'infrastructures universelles fournies par le marché. Nous retraçons le travail nécessaire pour augmenter les effets humanitaires de ces dispositifs à travers des processus de design, de fabrication et de distribution. Pour les entrepreneurs humanitaires, nous soutenons qu'échouer à répondre aux attentes est un échec à grande échelle.

Open access

Smallness and Small-device Heuristics

Scaling Fog Catchers Down and Up in Lima, Peru

Chakad Ojani

Abstract

This article focuses on understandings of fog capture as an alternative water supply system in Lima. In neighbourhoods where state infrastructure is missing, fog catchers promise to alleviate residents’ dependency on private water suppliers. However, the utility of these micro-infrastructures is not self-evident. I show how a local NGO attempted to bring about commitment among prospective beneficiaries by framing the fog catchers against the size and incapacity of state infrastructure. In the NGO's rhetoric, the fog catchers’ limited scale vis-à-vis state infrastructure meant that they were better suited for addressing spaces that escaped state attention. Yet this also presented fog capture as a small-scale alternative that could be scaled up to respond to a problem of substantial ubiquity. The article concludes by suggesting that anthropologists’ uses of smallness as a trope for aggrandising their own methodological dispositions be repurposed for investigating the role of smallness in pursuits of macro effects.

Résumé

L'article s'attache à comprendre la capture de la brume comme système alternatif de production d'eau potable à Lima. Dans les quartiers où les infrastructure d’État sont absentes, les dispositifs collecteurs de brume sont présentés comme une solution pour atténuer la dépendance des résidents aux camions citernes privés. Cependant, l'utilité de ces micro-infrastructures n'est pas évident. À partir d'une enquête auprès d'une ONG locale en quête de bénéficiaires pour ses initiatives d'installation de capteurs de brume autour de la ville, je montre que de telles idées doivent au contraire être délibérément apportées. L'implication des récipiendaires potentiels dans les projets de l'ONG était recherchée en partie par la mise en scène d'une opposition d’échelle. Dans la rhétorique des membres de l'ONG, l’échelle limitée des collecteurs de brume au regard des infrastructures d’État impliquait d'elle-même qu'elle était mieux en mesure de s'adapter à des espaces qui échappent à l'attention des politiques d'aménagement. Ainsi, on présente les collecteurs de brume comme une alternative de petite taille qui pourrait dans l'absolu changer d’échelle afin de répondre à un problème manifeste d'invisibilisation. L'article conclut avec une discussion sur l'utilisation de la petitesse en anthropologie comme un trope pour agrandir ses propres découvertes et dispositifs méthodologiques. Je suggère que cette histoire de l'attention au petit devrait être reconsidérée pour mieux enquêter sur le rôle de la petitesse dans la poursuite d'effets macros.

Open access

Waiting for the Inevitable

Permanent Emergency, Therapeutic Domination and Homo Pandemicus

Laurence Mcfalls and Mariella Pandolfi

Abstract

Drawing on twenty-five years of ethnographic observation and reflection on humanitarian interventions’ power practices and on theoretical inspirations from Michel Foucault, Giorgio Agamben, Gilles Deleuze, Max Weber and Ernesto de Martino, we show that, in the current health crisis, new modes of truth, power and subjectivity have emerged in a space between ‘too late’ liberalism (i.e. the final moment of liberalism in which it reveals the inherent impossibility of its promise of prosperity and freedom for all) and ‘too soon’ authoritarianism (i.e. a self-imposed subordination to incontestable biosecurity imperatives). Self-sacrifice, self-imposed subalternity and hopeful, docile acceptance, or alternatively blind rage, in the face of the ‘inevitable’ characterise homo pandemicus, the ultimate liberal subject. Developed on sites of humanitarian intervention, the logic of ‘permanent emergency’ is the regulatory dispositive that perpetuates therapeutic domination on a planetary scale.

En s'appuyant sur vingt-cinq ans d'observation ethnographique et de réflexion sur les pratiques de pouvoir des interventions humanitaires, et inspirés des théories de Foucault, Agamben, Deleuze, Weber et De Martino, nous montrons que, dans la crise sanitaire actuelle, de nouveaux modes de vérité, de pouvoir et de subjectivité ont émergé dans un espace entre le libéralisme “trop tard” (c'est-à-dire le moment final du libéralisme dans lequel il révèle l'impossibilité inhérente de sa promesse de prospérité et de liberté pour tous) et l'autoritarisme “trop tôt” (c'est-à-dire la subordination auto-infligée à des impératifs incontestables de biosécurité). L'abnégation, la subalternité auto-imposée, la docilité naïvement optimiste ou encore la rage aveugle face, face à “l'inévitable” caractérisent l'Homo Pandémicus, le sujet libéral par excellence. Développée sur les sites d'intervention humanitaire, la logique de “l'urgence permanente” est le dispositif régulateur qui perpétue la domination thérapeutique à l’échelle planétaire.