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Hanna Retallack

’ sexuality within a schizoid landscape as she observes girls’ expectations of egalitarianism in the workplace, and draws on the narratives of successful girls that position them as “winning” because they are succeeding in education and “outnumber boys at

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The New Girl Loves Chemistry

The Story of a Forgotten Era

Katherine Darvesh

and Dorothea Beale, respectively. Buss became headmistress of NLCS in 1850 at the age of 23, and Beale became second principal of CLC in 1858 at the age of 27. NLCS was a fairly egalitarian day-school for daughters of the middle class, whereas CLC was

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Enis Sulstarova

about the doctrine and morality of Islam; the ideal of a universal and largely egalitarian Muslim community comprised of different classes and races; the main Islamic institutions and rituals; and the life of its founder and prophet. Yet at the same time

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Girl Constructed in Two Nonfiction Texts

Sexual Subject? Desired Object?

Mary Ann Harlan

, asking for more openness that focuses on communication and, even, pleasure. She recognizes that we have raised “a generation of girls to have a voice, expect egalitarian treatment” (236) but that has not extended to how girls’ sexual subjectivity is

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April Mandrona

sensibilities have consistently challenged the tendency in much moral philosophy to begin theorizing, either implicitly or explicitly, from a picture of moral persons as fully formed adults, who are not located in egalitarian societies, who do not experience

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Melissa DeLury

also how it fuels morality issues. Thomas Eriksen has observed that the Hindutva movement gained momentum in response to increased attention to and discussion of the need to establish a more egalitarian society with equal rights for Dalits (lower castes

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Daniela R. P. Weiner

reforms that would lead to a more egalitarian state school system for all children, while the British were content to support the status quo and only gradually coax German educational officials toward reform. 54 This may have been due to the differences

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Reclaiming Feminism

A Qualitative Investigation of Language Usage by Girls in a High School Women's Studies Course

Jennifer L. Martin

This article examines the impact of women's studies on at-risk high school girls. This analysis was conducted within a larger intervention study examining the effect of women's studies on levels of sexual harassment within the school. As a teacher researcher, I observed that students were embracing terms traditionally degrading to women so I then began to study the language usage of the students in the course as a separate study. I assessed changes in the language usage of students and observed the evolution of their language. It became, as the course progressed, more egalitarian and em powered as they embraced feminist principles.

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Maria-Amelia Viteri and Aaron Tobler

This article illustrates the multiple ways in which anthropology graduate students crossed the boundaries of educational discourses by encouraging themselves, other students, activists and community leaders to speak in dialogical contexts (Giroux 2005: 73). They did this through the organisation of the Interrogating Diversity Conference. The authors organised this conference in March 2007 at the American University, Washington, DC, to expand scholarship on surveillance and policing in an egalitarian forum. We discuss how students can engage their departments and faculty in building the students' knowledge of both anthropological theories and methodology through shared scholarship. We show how students can 'apply' anthropology to audiences, which will in turn influence policy decision making. In addition, the authors explore how academics can transform knowledge sharing into tools that shape broader political and social dialogue.

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Posthumous Rescue

The Shafia Young Women as Worthy Victims

Yasmin Jiwani

This article focuses on the coverage of the murders of the young Shafia women. Based on an analysis of the coverage published in The Globe and Mail (July 2009 to March 2012), I argue that the young women were constructed as exceptional and worthy victims of a particularly heinous crime—honor killing—allegedly imported from Afghanistan by the Shafia patriarch. I interrogate the different threads that were interwoven to construct these young women's representations to make them intelligible as girls and young women. Within the coverage, the trope of culture clash anchored in an Orientalist framing worked to consolidate their representations as worthy victims and re-inscribe the national imaginary of Canadian society as egalitarian, tolerant and beyond gender violence. These different maneuvers served to accomplish a kind of posthumous rescue in a domestic context akin to the strategies of rescue implemented by Western powers in the War on Terror to save Afghan women.