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Environmental Public Participation in the UK

Hinrich Voss

The purpose of this article is to analyze environmental public participation in the UK from the perspective of the polluting organization. Public participation, or an organization's stakeholder management, describes various channels available for the public to engage with and influence decision-making processes. Over the lifetime of an organization, the public seeks to engage with the organization or with specific goods or services offered. Such concerns and requests are made, and the organization responds to them, according to how salient members of the public are as stakeholders at a given time and place. Using case study examples from the UK, I illustrate the channels of engagement, the public interest groups that do engage and how effective these procedures are. It follows from this that early, inclusive and open engagement with the objective of participation in decision-making processes are the most effective public participation models and have the greatest social quality potential.

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The Rule of Law as a Condition for Development Toward Sustainability

Toward a New Legally Oriented Environment at a Global Level

Giovanni Tartaglia Polcini

The Italian model of “confiscation” determines a severe loss of prestige and influence for mafias in their own environment, since it stops their capacity to condition the surrounding territorial socioeconomic realities. The Italian Development

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Humanosphere Potentiality Index

Appraising Existing Indicators from a Long-term Perspective

Takahiro Sato, Mario Ivan López, Taizo Wada, Shiro Sato, Makoto Nishi, and Kazuo Watanabe

More than a quarter of a century has passed since the publication of the landmark Brundtland report “Our Common Future,” from the World Commission on Environment and Development, which defined sustainable development as “development that meets the

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Human Security Analysis as a Framework for Value-Oriented Governance

The Example of Climate Change

Des Gasper

“Good governance” may be viewed as governance that effectively promotes human rights, human security and human development. This article discusses human security analysis, which in certain ways offers an integration of these “human” perspectives together with a “social” orientation, by combining a person-focus with systematic investigation of the environing systems of all sorts: physical, cultural, organizational. The importance of such analysis is illustrated through the example of climate change impacts and adaptation. The article presents applications of a human security framework in governance, for policy analysis, planning and evaluation issues in climate change and other fields. The concluding section suggests that human security analysis may provide a way to apply insights from social quality analysis to detailed case investigation and policy analysis, while reducing macro-sociological abstraction and neglect of the natural environment.

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Environmental Sustainability as Indicator of Social Quality

The New Opportunities Offered by Communication

Renato Fontana and Martina Ferrucci

Compared to the European scenario that emerged from the analysis of Eurobarometer (2011–2014) surveys, we conducted a research on the opinions of the Italian students and professionals from eight focus groups about the relation between environmental issues, social quality and communication. The assumption is that communication is a strategic factor that could contribute to determining the social quality and, consequently, the satisfaction of the common people. The study demonstrates that it is necessary to plan well-thought-out communication activities aimed at increasing awareness of environmental issues. Findings from this study support the need to develop a greater awareness and a renewed critical consciousness of the relationships between person, environment and social quality.

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Living Without God: Reply to Comments

Ronald Aronson

Not believing in God is, on the one hand, a very simple matter. As most Danes and Swedes know, it is increasingly possible to grow up in a wholly secular environment, where questions about sin, grace, and an afterlife never get posed, where well-being is taken for granted, where people feel protected and reassured not by churches but by societal institutions. But on the other hand, as Sartre said, “becoming an atheist is a long a difficult undertaking.” Becoming an atheist in a religious culture entails sorting through a series of profound issues. To think through what this means and how to live one’s entire life in a world without God requires addressing, as Sartre knew, life’s ultimate questions about “man and the universe.” It is, in short, one thing to live as if God does not exist, but quite another to provide secular answers to Kant’s three great philosophical questions: “What can I know?”, “What may I hope?”, “What should I do?” This is what my book, Living without God, sets out to do.

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Corporate Sustainability

An Academic Review

Varghese Joy

processing of raw materials, and the natural environment. Compared to the past practices, nowadays most entities are disclosing the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of their operations and posting them online on their websites. Stuart Erick and Greg

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Searching for a New Way of Thinking about Society

A Noospheric Social Quality Orientation for Development toward Sustainability

Vyacheslav Nikolayevitch Bobkov and Nikolay Vyacheslavovich Bobkov

financial resources, housing and the environment, health, education, and employment; social inclusion—the opportunity to participate in political/juridical, cultural/welfare, and economic/financial life; social cohesion—the degree to which social relations

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Public Evaluation of Society in China

The Social Quality Approach

Ren Liying and Zou Yuchin

level, housing area, social security programs Satisfaction with family economic situation; satisfaction with residential environment Evaluation of social security; evaluation of societal safety Social cohesion Altruistic behavior

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An Exogenous Path of Development

Explaining the Rise of Corporate Social Responsibility in China

Ka Lin, Dan Banik, and Longfei Yi

commentators highlight the CSR actions of profit makers supplying products or services, we focus on social relations and the social environment that generate the spread of CSR as well. There is an urgent need to specifically examine the roles of non