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The Temporality of and Competition between Infrastructures

Taxis and E-Hailing in China

Jack Linzhou Xing

E-hailing is a recent innovation in urban transport infrastructure. E-hailing companies operate online platforms and use algorithms to match passengers with cars, without owning cars or formally employing drivers. Didi, with seventy-seven million

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A Brief History of Smart Transportation Infrastructure

Kathleen Frazer Oswald

What Is Smart Transportation Infrastructure? While smart technologies generally align with twenty-first-century sensibilities concerning technology, convenience, safety, and security, no consistent definition for smart exists. 2 In most

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Introduction

Precarious Connections: On the Promise and Menace of Railroad Projects

Peter Schweitzer and Olga Povoroznyuk

underlying component of the transport infrastructure our special issue is interested in. Despite all (infra)structural similarities, road and railroad stand for two contrasting ideological qualities of passenger and cargo transport, namely private versus

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(Re)Constructing the Baikal-Amur Mainline

Continuity and Change of (Post)Socialist Infrastructure

Olga Povoroznyuk

promises of modernity. By the end of the construction, however, which almost coincides with the end of the socialist era, economic bust, infrastructural decline, public disillusionment and criticism clouded the BAM project. The 1990s were marked by the

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When One Becomes Two

Man–Machine Hybridization in Urban Cyclists with Broken Bikes

Lou Therese Brandner

merging of social formations. Hybridity has been explored in diverse contexts, such as athletes and sporting technologies, 9 horseback riding, 10 urban infrastructure, 11 disability, 12 and the relationship between dogs and their owners. 13 In the

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Urban Electric Public Transport in Eastern and Southeastern Europe: Toward a Historical Anthropology of Infrastructural Crises

Andrey Vozyanov

Crises in urban electric transport infrastructure of Eastern and Southeastern Europe present not only a fruitful subject for historical, ethnographic, and sociological inquiry, but also contribute to two intersecting knowledge fields. First, to the multidisciplinary constellation of studies dedicated to failures of sociotechnical systems that I will refer to as disaster and crisis studies. And second, to social studies of urban transit in the former Socialist Bloc, a subfield within broader mobility and transport studies. In this text I will review the state of both these fields and then proceed to conceptualize the intersections between them, proposing historical anthropology as an integration tool. In the process I will occasionally refer to my fieldwork in Donbas, Ukraine, from 2011 to 2013, and eastern Romania since 2015.

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After Disasters

Infrastructures, (Im)mobilities, and the Politics of Recovery

Benjamin Linder and Galen Murton

After Disasters: Infrastructures, (Im)mobilities, and the Politics of Recovery By now, it is pat to say that the coronavirus pandemic has reoriented the geographies and temporalities of everyday existence, from leisure travel to professional

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Mobilities and the Multinatural

A Test Case in India

Thomas Birtchnell

preoccupation with technological, infrastructural, and the human-made world. But could they instead be the centerpieces of mobilities research? A deeper question here is: Beyond incidental and circumstantial encounters with humans as they move, how can

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The Freeway Journey

Landscape and Mobility in the Southern Auto Industry

John E. Mohr

automotive industry,” which has “long delivered the right resources and talent to help companies thrive.” 25 Observers put the total value of the state and local incentives in the deal at $410 million, which included property tax abatements, infrastructure

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Ports Matter: Supply Chain Logics and the Sociocultural Context of Infrastructure in Port Studies

Janell Rothenberg

Viewed from a distance, a large container port looks like any other. Terminals and stacked containers are marked by a narrowing set of multinational operators and shipping companies. Fences project promises of security and safety that are often enacted by the local hires of global security firms. Perhaps longshoremen are visible locking a container into place aboard a vessel, although the docks of contemporary container terminals are more notable for the seeming lack of men at work. Critical scholars of supply chains are revealing the global logics behind such visible similarities in port economy and governance. While this work responds to the call of John Shaw and James Sidaway to recognize how “[ports] matter beyond being entities in and of themselves,” ports are also shaped by more proximate, sociocultural logics.