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Evenki Adolescents’ Identities

Negotiating the Modern and the Traditional in Educational Settings

Svetlana Huusko

Abstract

Young Evenkis grow up in the middle of powerful colonial representations of their culture, community, and history. These are constructed in and disseminated through popular oral culture, education, museums, and shape both Russian ideas of Evenkis and the self-identity of the indigenous youth. This article discusses how the Evenki adolescents construct their personal identities and negotiate with dominant representations of Evenkiness within educational settings in Russia. When the indigenous culture is represented as locked in the past, the adolescents, while identifying themselves as indigenous, view themselves outside the culture. Fieldwork results show how the local approach to understanding “tradition” and “modernity” leads to the marginalization of indigenous culture and to assimilation among Evenki adolescents in Buriatiia, Russia.

Open access

Autobiography, Anthropology

A Personal Historical Recollection

Judith Okely

available for all to read and celebrate. Instead, it has been important to explore some of the context of its emergence. But I should mention something about the photographs. They indeed reveal the personal identity of the specific researcher, including the

Open access

Azim Malikov

. ( Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press ). 10.7591/cornell/9780801454097.001.0001 Layder , D. ( 2004 ), Social and Personal Identity: Understanding Yourself ( London, Thousandoaks. New Delhi : Sage ). Louw , M.E. ( 2007 ), Everyday Islam in

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The Gurdwara in Britain

Narratives of Meaning, Use and Development

Clare Canning

walking interviews. He uses the work of Casey (2001: 684 ) to underpin the method, who states that ‘we can no longer distinguish neatly between physical and personal identity […] place is regarded as constitutive of one’s sense of self’. Bimbling, which