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Nicolas Jabko’s Playing the Market

Martha Zuber, Frank Dobbin, Amy Verdun, Thomas Philippon, and Nicolas Jabko

Martha Zuber Introduction

Frank Dobbin Integrating Paradigms

Amy Verdun Strategy, Ideas, and Political Leadership

Thomas Philippon Economics and Playing the Market

Nicolas Jabko A Response to My Critics

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Playing Seriously with Bad Faith: A Derridean Intersection

Dane Sawyer

In this article, I reconsider the question of how best to understand Sartre's concept of bad faith by investigating it through the Derridean lens of deconstruction. I argue that Sartre's discussion of bad faith in Being and Nothingness mirrors Derrida's criticisms of structuralism in 'Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences'. Examining their distinctive discussions of 'play', I claim that Derrida's unique deconstructive interpretation of this notion operates within Sartre's criticisms of the 'spirit of seriousness'. I reinterpret bad faith as the attempt to solidify a permanent structure of one's personality, in order to avoid or escape from the 'play' or 'freedom' built into structures and our existential condition, and conclude that embracing 'play' is an essential characteristic of authenticity.

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The Devil and the Good Lord: What did Goethe's Faust Contribute to Sartre's Play?

Yaffa Wolfman

In this article we shall attempt to show that despite the originality of Sartre's writings and the original philosophical views they contain, his reliance on Goethe's Faust in The Devil and the Good Lord proves that he was quite familiar with the components of the former and made intensive use of them in his own play. A comparative analysis of the two texts will show that Sartre exploited any ethical problem, human act, historical name and fact which he was able to fit into his own philosophical and social positions and which could contribute to his dramatic art.

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Les Mouches and Le Malentendu: Parallel Plays

Benedict O'Donohoe

Sartre's Resistance myth, The Flies (1943), and Camus's contemporaneous modern tragedy, The Misunderstanding (1944), show remarkable similarities in conception, composition, themes, characters, relationships and intrigue. However, from the moment when the plots converge—each protagonist choosing to remain in his precarious new situation—they also diverge diametrically: Camus's Jan is doomed to reified passivity and death; Sartre's Oreste is galvanised into decisive action and new life. Does Camus's orientation toward nihilistic despair translate a negative assessment of his war-time role as an intellectual, and Sartre's much more positive disposition equally represent his affirmation of writing as a valid resistance activity?

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

? What role does imagination play in seeing someone in a portrait of them? What about in seeing Chevalier in Franconnay's imitation (or ‘performative simulation’) of him? Elad Magomedov's question is even trickier: how do we navigate the similarities and

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Is France Still Relevant?

Sophie Meunier

trend-setter? Is France still a model to be aspired to? Whereas France plays a disproportionate role in foreign policy and is still a highly relevant diplomatic and military actor, it has lost political clout in Europe. Its culture no longer

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Jews and Christians in Vichy France

New and Renewed Perspectives

Michael Sutton

, minister of justice from July 1940 to January 1941, and Xavier Vallat, head of the Commissariat général aux questions juives (CGQJ) from March 1941 to May 1942. Both were close to Charles Maurras and the Action française, and Alibert played a large part in

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Sartre and Theatrical Ambiguity

John Gillespie

This overview of Sartre's theater within the context of the symposium focuses on the inherent ambiguities of his theory and practice. His plays, as committed literature, are not always successful in their pedagogical intention of changing the minds of his audiences. On the one hand, he seeks to provide universal situations with which everyone can collectively identify, and on the other he wishes to convince them of the value of freedom and confront them with problems and conflicts they must resolve for themselves. These spectators then exercise that freedom by taking ideological viewpoints that are in conflict with those of the plays. Moreover, the plays are often complex and ambiguous, and set far from a contemporary French context, thus demanding a certain sophistication of interpretation. Sartre's skill as a dramatist is to write plays that engage the public in debates about the key questions of the day, even though, because of his open approach, he does not always succeed in changing their minds.

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Dramatically Different: The Reception of Sartre's Theatre in London and New York

Benedict O'Donahoe

The autumn of 1998 saw a fiftieth anniversary revival of Sartre’s Les Mains sales at the Théâtre Antoine in Paris, complete with facsimile programme of its premiere, placing emphasis upon the chequered history of this controversial play. The review in Le Monde also privileged an account of the political context of the play’s creation over an assessment of the production’s virtues: ‘Nous regardons la photo un peu passée de ce qui nous avait secoués.’ This reception suggests that Sartre the dramatist is already remembered chiefly as the author of circumstantial and thesis plays whose interest depended largely upon their historical moment. It is noticeable that other pastmasters, more ‘past’ than Sartre – Molière, Racine, Feydeau – attracted greater critical attention in the Parisian rentrée of that year, as did one near-anagrammatic contemporary, Nathalie Sarraute.

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Sartre's Theater of Resistance: Les Mouches and the Deadlock of Collective Responsibility

Andrew Ryder

Sartre's play Les Mouches (The Flies), first performed in 1943 under German occupation, has long been controversial. While intended to encourage resistance against the Nazis, its approval by the censor indicates that the regime did not recognize the play as a threat. Further, its apparently violent and solitary themes have been read as irresponsible or apolitical. For these reasons, the play has been characterized as ambiguous or worse. Sartre himself later saw it as overemphasizing individual autonomy, and in the view of one critic, it conveys an “existentialist fascism.” In response to this reading, it is necessary to attend to the elements of the play that already emphasize duty to society. From this perspective, the play can be seen as anticipating the concern with collective responsibility usually associated with the later Sartre of the 1960s. More than this, the play's apparent “ambiguity” can be found to exemplify a didacticism that is much more complex than sometimes attributed to Sartre. It is not only an exhortation about ethical responsibility, but also a performance of the difficulties attendant to that duty.