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Eckhardt Fuchs

The words “textbook revision” immediately conjure up certain images. We generally think of conflicts surrounding the contents of textbooks, conflicts which are debated in public and usually have an international dimension. Textbook revision generally refers to books on history, geography and social studies, occasionally also religion or biology. It generally relates to those activities aimed at correcting false or distorted interpretations in school textbooks. In addition, it involves two further aspects: improving the quality of teaching with revised textbooks, and conveying universal norms in addition to knowledge of the subject. History and social studies teaching can thus make an important contribution to peace and human rights education.

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Deevia Bhana and Emmanuel Mayeza

In this article we focus on sixty South African primary schoolgirls’ experiences of male violence and bullying. Rejecting outmoded constructions of schoolgirls as passive, we examine how girls draw on different forms of femininity to manage and address violence at school. These femininities are non-normative in their advancing of violence to stop violence but are also imbued with culturally relevant meanings about care, forgiveness, and humanity based on the African principle of ubuntu. Moving away from the discursive production of girls’ victimhood, we show how girls construct their own agency as they actively participate in multiple forms of femininity advocating both violence and forgiveness. Given the absence of teacher and parental support for girls’ safety, we conclude with a call to address interventions contextually, from schoolgirls’ own perspectives.

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Kira Mahamud Angulo and Yovana Hernández Laina

world over. 8 Bearing these premises in mind, we set ourselves three objectives: to examine discourse on economic matters in official political documents related to education; to analyze the transmission of economic culture(s) in primary school textbooks

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Haifaa Majadly and Aharon Geva-Kleinberger

low achievement levels in all stages of education, a high number of reading and writing errors, 3 and a lack of interest in the subject among pupils. 4 In other words, school systems in the Arab world typically fail to achieve their goals in this

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Esilda Luku

history in Albanian history textbooks, but does not mention the efforts of Albanians to rescue Jews during the Holocaust. 3 While numerous international studies exist on the representation of the Holocaust in school textbooks and on Holocaust education

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Marc Kropman, Carla van Boxtel, and Jannet van Drie

. Research shows that, in several countries, textbook narratives about a nation's past tend to represent a limited, nationalistic perspective. 3 In the Netherlands, secondary school pupils are expected to develop their historical thinking and reasoning

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Andreas Weiß

-Dietrich Schultz points out that the emergence of the discipline as a university subject was accompanied by the prejudice that it would be “little more than an inferior school science … hardly a satisfying discipline, merely an encyclopaedic textbook and school

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School History Atlases as Instruments of Nation-State Making and Maintenance

A Remark on the Invisibility of Ideology in Popular Education

Tomasz Kamusella

School history atlases are used almost exclusively as required textbooks in Central and Eastern Europe, where the model of the ethnolinguistic nation-state rules supreme. My hypothesis is that these atlases are used in this region because a graphic presentation of the past makes it possible for students to grasp the idea of the presumably "natural" or "inescapable" overlapping of historical, linguistic, and demographic borders, the striving for which produced the present-day ethnolinguistic nation-states. Conversely, school history atlases provide a framework to indoctrinate the student with the beliefs that ethnolinguistic nationalism is the sole correct kind of nationalism, and that the neighboring polities have time and again unjustly denied the "true and natural" frontiers to the student's nation-state.

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Ryôta Nishino

This article examines how middle school history textbooks published between 1951 and 1995 explain the origins of the Japanese as an ethnic group (minzoku). The analysis shows that despite the relatively long period from which the sample of textbooks was taken, these texts continue to emphasize two categories of Japanese identity: a biologically heterogeneous people through prehistoric immigration and a unified language. Building on the latter theme, the textbooks continued to treat the innovation of the kana as a quintessential development underlying the Japanese cultural achievement. The analysis reveals that the narrative tone shifted from being emotive in the early 1950s texts to somewhat muted in later decades.

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Mariano González-Delgado and Manuel Ferraz-Lorenzo

This article explains the approach to mass consumption developed in social studies textbooks in the early years of the transition to democracy in Spain. It begins by examining the way in which school textbooks represented consumer society and mass media in the late 1970s. This is followed by an in-depth explanation of the reasons that led the authors of these textbooks to choose one theoretical framework over another. Above all, this article emphasizes the complexity and variety of the historical materials used to represent consumer society, and how this process of social construction is reflected in the textbook content of the time.