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Breaking Barriers and Coded Language

Watching Politics of Race at the Ballpark

Thomas D. Bunting

Drawing on recent literature on political spectatorship, I show how sport, and baseball in particular, can both illuminate and shape American politics. Following the history of racial segregation and immigrant assimilation in baseball, one sees that it mirrors American race politics on the whole. I argue that Jackie Robinson and the desegregation of baseball changed both American politics and the horizons within which citizens think. Although it is tempting to focus on this positive and emergent moment, I argue that for the most part, looking at the history of race in baseball shows instead coded language that reinforces racial stereotypes. This example of baseball and race shows how powerful spectatorship can be in the democratic world. Spectatorship need not be passive but can be an important sphere of activity in democratic life.

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Pictures, Emotions, Conceptual Change

Anger in Popular Hindi Cinema

Imke Rajamani

The article advocates the importance of studying conceptual meaning and change in modern mass media and highlights the significance of conceptual intermediality. The article first analyzes anger in Hindi cinema as an audiovisual key concept within the framework of an Indian national ideology. It explores how anger and the Indian angry young man became popularized, politicized, and stereotyped by popular films and print media in India in the 1970s and 1980s. The article goes on to advocate for extending conceptual history beyond language on theoretical grounds and identifies two major obstacles in political iconography: the methodological subordination of visuals to language in the negotiation of meaning, and the distinction of emotion and reason by assigning them functionally to different sign systems.

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After “A Youth on Fire“

The Woman Veteran in Iulia Drunina's Postwar Poetry

Adrienne M. Harris

The article uses Soviet poet Iuliia Drunina's deeply personal and o en autobiographical poetry as a lens through which to view the woman veteran's experience, especially during the time of the state-promoted cult of World War II and the erosion of the cult during perestroika. Gender and World War II remain consistent themes in Drunina's poetry, but in her oeuvre, one finds an evolution in how the poet-veteran relates to the war. From 1942 on, Drunina consciously assumed the role of the voice for women soldiers, but as the war receded into the past and the number of veterans dwindled, Drunina began to write more frequently on behalf of veterans of both sexes. This article details numerous war and gender-related themes: gendered otherness during the war, demobilization, stereotypes of women soldiers, the sacred nature of the war, the duty to remember, front-line friendship, and the persistence of the war in veterans' lives.

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Jan Berting

opposition: the types of behavior and the values and norms of the Other are incommensurable with “our” characteristics as group members. This opposition is often expressed in a stereotypical way. Such stereotypes about the Other are part of the inside view of

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Chiara Bonfiglioli

in which individual activists engaged in transnational encounters often disrupted mutual stereotypes rooted in geopolitical divides. Ghodsee's volume, instead, combines archival sources and ethnographic accounts (notably interviews with a handful of

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Sharon A. Kowalsky

inspired her readers to re-evaluate their own stereotypes and ideas about cultural identity. Haleta shows how Yablonska created a unique genre in Ukrainian literature that situated her outside the established canon but allowed her to place gender at the

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Marija Bulatović and Višnja Krstić

mora i tri okeana, Dimitrijević's experience of traveling as “a woman of her age” (50) sets the basis for her examination of customary beliefs and for questioning the stereotypes common in her own society, where the “older lot” dare not travel on their

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Becoming Communist

Ideals, Dreams, and Nightmares

Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

some gender stereotypes more easily than Polish women and men, who clung to more traditional notions of femininity. But while Lithuanian women were more able to engage in traditionally male types of physical labor, they would sometimes sacrifice the

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Instead of a Novel

Sophia Yablonska's Travelogues in the History of Modern Ukrainian Literature

Olena Haleta

discursively, and her previous education did not give her any of the necessary skills. As she began her travels from Europe in the direction of the East, Yablonska was partly exposed to the stereotypes and prejudices of an imperial perspective, but at the same

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Women and Gender in Europe from 1939 to the Present

Challenging and Reassessing the Narrative

Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

countries and compare them with what existed before. Without an understanding of the structures underpinning or failing to underpin the economy in the postsocialist transition, Western observers in particular have fallen back on stereotypes, exceptionalizing