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The Pariah Princess

Agency, Representation, and Neoliberal Jewish Girlhood

Michele Byers

The focus of the essay is the well known (and worn) stereotype of the Jewish American Princess or JAP. Spoiled, frigid, loud, defiant, the JAP refuses to behave in civilized ways even as she constantly transgresses the boundaries of civilized social spaces. Both an intimate insider, and an eternal outsider, the JAP is a boundary figure whose presence draws and redraws myths of assimilative ideals and citizenship rights in American culture. The complexity of these social relations, their apparent contradictions, and the possibilities they may offer for agency and resistance in both 'real' and fictive contexts are explored through close examinations of four high profile JAPS—Cher Horowitz of the film Clueless, Monica Lewinsky, Jessica Stein of the film Kissing Jessica Stein, and Lizzie Grubman.

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Narrating Muslim Girlhood in the Pakistani Cityscape of Graphic Narratives

Tehmina Pirzada

violence. Instead, she chooses peace, love, logic, and reason as viable tactics to overcome her enemies. These tactics are particularly significant because they not only subvert the platitudinous stereotype about the Muslim community, especially Muslim men

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Girls’ Perspectives on (Mis)Representations of Girlhood in Hegemonic Media Texts

Paula MacDowell

through their media production processes. I believe that if we want to learn more about girls we need to listen to their stories. Additionally, if we want girls to transform gender stereotypes in popular media we need to educate and empower them to create

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I’m Not Loud, I’m Outspoken

Narratives of Four Jamaican Girls’ Identity and Academic Success

Rowena Linton and Lorna McLean

schooling for black students. While attempts have been made to eliminate these problems institutionally, some black female students, as we shall see, have taken matters into their own hands so as to defy stereotypes, and have, instead, excelled academically

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A Girl of a Certain Age

Claudia Mitchell

. The exploration of how tweens construct their own digital identities that challenge the stereotypical media portrayals of girlhood and the investigation of the relationship for tween girls between sexting and sexual agency expand on crucial areas in

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“Farmers Don't Dance”

The Construction of Gender in a Rural Scottish School

Fiona G. Menzies and Ninetta Santoro

, therefore, he considers her to be “more of a boy.” Furthermore, she plays rugby, is physically strong, and does not mind getting dirty. These attributes are in direct contrast to the stereotypical view of dancers who are seen to be delicate and fragile

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From Risk to Resistance

Girls and Technologies of Nonviolence

Laurel Hart

include retraumatization, anonymity, participants’ accessibility to technologies, the perpetuation of stereotypes, and consent in group work. They offer the questions that have emerged in the field, cite experiences that have led to greater understanding

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Reading and Re-Reading Models of Girlhood

Erin Newcomb

, the princess story subgenre exerts influence at the social and personal levels. Rothschild describes “periods of ‘gender intensification,’ stages in life when the person is more aware of and influenced by traditional gender stereotypes” (6); such

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Smart Girl Identity

Possibilities and Implications

Bernice Loh

part in the constr uctions and complexities of smartness. The girls in Raby and Pomerantz’s study often brought up the differences between prestigious and less prestigious schools, and made references to the “smart Asian stereotype” (139) to explain why

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Queering Virginity

From Unruly Girls to Effeminate Boys

Eftihia Mihelakis

virginity” (69). The authors guide us through the “queerness and strangeness of male virginity precisely because it contradicts stereotypes often associated with male sexuality” (78) by exposing instances of Edward’s experiences of erotophobia, hysteria, and