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Catalin Brylla and Mette Kramer

related but not interchangeable. Another example is the use of social stereotypes—a common contextual coefficient in documentary production and reception. This particular coefficient may or may not lead to the social impact of prejudice toward and

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Andreas Baranowski and Heiko Hecht

stereotypes of people ( Thomas and Johnston 1981 ) and experiences ( Bordwell 1985 ) to let viewers form simplified representations of the portrayed events. Thus, simplifications are deliberately used by moviemakers, either to help the audience comprehend a

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David Bordwell

a role for stereotyped conceptual structures that the perceiver deploys in order to identify what’s going on and fit that to a larger context. My only substantive comment on Joe and James’s useful analysis is to wonder whether the focus on verbal

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Ivan Mozzhukhin’s Acting Style

Beyond the Kuleshov Effect

Johannes Riis

: Stage Pictorialism and Early Film . New York : Oxford University Press . Bulgakowa , Oksana . 2005 . “ The ‘Russian Vogue’ in Europe and Hollywood: The Transformation of Russian Stereotypes through the 1920s .” The Russian Review 64 ( 2 ): 211

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The Aesthetics of Boredom

Slow Cinema and the Virtues of the Long Take in Once Upon a Time in Anatolia

Emre Çağlayan

suggests a distant kinship to Turkish literary works such as Yakup Kadri Karaosmanoğlu’s Yaban (The Stranger, 1932). The novel portrays the experiences of a stereotypical Republican subject, an enlightened individual (typically a doctor, teacher, or

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Rogue or Lover

Value-Maximizing Interpretations of Withnail and I

Peter Alward

Robinson received from Zeffirelli does not excuse the portrayal of Monty in this episode as a sexual predator, a portrayal that perpetuates harmful stereotypes. Moreover, any ameliorating effect the allusions made by these episodes might have is undermined

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Pushing the Boundaries

Curating LuYang, a Global Artist Embedded in Local Situatedness

Nora Gantert and Malte Lin-Kröger

Europe. According to Mimi Wong, “different Asian cultures often already appear interchangeable in the West, while an ‘Asian’ identity is sometimes used to stereotype artists and their work” ( Wong 2020 ). The aporia of displaying racial and cultural

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Groped and Gutted

Hollywood's Hegemonic Reimagining of Counterculture

Samantha Eddy

-Guzman (2016) terms this the “Hollywood Paradox”: seemingly, Hollywood emerges as a subject of diversification in mainstream media and yet the mechanisms of legitimate diversification—beyond tokenizing or stereotyping—are actively blockaded by Hollywood

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Close to You

Karen Carpenter and the Body-Martyr in Queer Memory

Julian Binder

Abstract

There has been much thought given to role of the body as a site of political, physiological, and cultural negotiation. What place then does the beloved and astonishingly affective singer of 1970s soft-rock, Karen Carpenter, occupy in this weighty discourse? Karen's death from complications related to her eating disorder in 1983 shocked the public, eliciting a new wave of cultural consciousness about the embodied nature of mental illness. But beyond the stereotypical white suburban Carpenters fan, Karen and her story had already become a cult favorite amongst the queer avant-garde as soon as four years after death, a mysterious phenomenon that I argue is decidedly queer in its emotional trafficking of Karen's subjectivity, among other areas. This essay explores the ways in which our bodies double as cultural repositories, as hallowed sites of memory, and as icons of martyrdom with the capacity to emit a healing resonance analogous to their fabricated religious counterparts. I must admit, this paper might also be guilty of occasionally engaging in the typical essentializing tendency toward Karen's personhood. For her sake then, reader, I ask you to ponder the following question with the same aversion to neat finality that you apply to your own story as you flip the page: who really was Karen Carpenter?

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Erin Ash

white privilege” (2010: 207). Further, white savior films may also reinforce negative attitudes about African Americans because the notion that the recipients of the savior’s kindness need to be saved naturalizes black stereotypes, particularly those