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The Politics of Fear, Mobility, and Media Discourses

A Case Study of Malmö

Vanessa Stjernborg, Mekonnen Tesfahuney, and Anders Wretstrand

This study focuses on Seved, a segregated and socioeconomically “poor” neighborhood in the city of Malmö in Sweden. It has attracted wide media coverage, a possible consequence of which is its increased stigmatization. The wide disparity between perceived or imagined fear and the actual incidence of, or exposure to, violence attests to the important role of the media in shaping mental maps and place images. Critical discourse analysis of daily newspaper articles shows that Seved is predominantly construed as unruly and a place of lawlessness. Mobility comprises an important aspect of the stigmatization of places, the politics of fear, and discourses of the “other.” In turn, place stigmatization, discourses of the other, and the politics of fear directly and indirectly affect mobility strategies of individuals and groups.

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On Growing a Journal

A View from the South

Georgine Clarsen

pressing. Their hopes for a secure future hang on the hours of unpaid work that an early-career researcher publication profile represents. Viewed in the instrumental terms of the neo-liberal academy, the tremendous commitment to the (largely hidden

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“Four Guys and a Hole in the Floor”

Racial Politics of Mobility and Excretion among BC-Based Long Haul Truckers

Amie McLean

interactions and research endeavors were inclusive of nonwhite drivers, the focus of this article is on the dominant (and dominating) narratives of white truckers. Neoliberalism and Gendered Racial Mobility Politics in Trucking In the BC-based trucking

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Contemporary Cosmologies, Critical Reimaginings

Allen Abramson and Martin Holbraad

How far is the ethnographic study of 'cosmologies' relevant to contemporary anthropology, and how might it illuminate understandings of the contemporary world? In this article we argue for a renewed anthropological interest in matters cosmological by seeking to disentangle the study of cosmology from the concomitants with which it was associated in earlier periods of anthropological research. In particular, we argue that an orientation toward cosmology continues to be of prime importance to the discipline insofar as it can be freed from its associations with holism and exoticism. The shift from 'high modernity' (in which orientations toward cosmos are variously constrained and circumscribed) to the flattening effects of the 'fluid' modernity of neoliberalism, we argue, has tended to thrust concerns with cosmic orders and dynamics back onto the forefront of people's lives. We end the article with a series of programmatic observations of how anthropologists might respond to these shifts, both ethnographically and analytically.

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Occupied Territory at the Interstices of the Sacred

Between Capital and Community

Paul-François Tremlett

In the autumn of 2011 and the spring of 2012, the Occupy London protests, informed by the ideal of a moral, territorially defined community, caught the imagination of British and global publics. For a short while, this moral imaginary was mobilized to contest some of the most glaring contradictions of the neo-liberal city. I argue that the Occupy protests in London registered a sense of public outrage at the violation of certain 'sacred' norms associated with what it means to live with others. More concretely, I contend that Occupy London was an experiment initiated to open out questions of community, morality, and politics and to consider how these notions might be put to work. These questions were not merely articulated intellectually among expert interlocutors. They were lived out through the spatially and temporally embodied occupation of urban space.

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The Politics of Faith and the Limits of Scientific Reason

Tracking the Anthropology of Human Rights and Religion

Kamari Maxine Clarke

This article explores the reality of translating or vernacularizing practices in relation to the politics of religion and the realities of faith. Taking violence as endemic to the processes of vernacularization and translation, the article articulates an analytic theory of religious faith—the way it is violated, often in the interest of making it legible within neo-liberal universalizing trends. Thinking about these realities involves understanding translations both as productive of cultural change and as manifestations of struggles over power. Many of these struggles are in the interstices among particular principles of individualism, secularism, legal rationality, and evidence. This article seeks to review the assumptions that emerge with these concepts and show their limits.

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Mobilizing Disability Studies

A Critical Perspective

Kudzai Matereke

, thus sharpening the focus on the link between COVID-19 and neoliberalism. For some, neoliberalism has facilitated the conditions for the spread of COVID-19 while also heightening the pandemic's dire consequences; yet for others, however, COVID-19 has

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Book Reviews

Mariske Westendorp, Bruno Reinhardt, Reinaldo L. Román, Jon Bialecki, Alexander Agadjanian, Karen Lauterbach, Juan Javier Rivera Andía, Kate Yanina DeConinck, Jack Hunter, Ioannis Kyriakakis, Magdalena Crăciun, Roger Canals, Cristina Rocha, Khyati Tripathi, Dafne Accoroni, and George Wu Bayuga

against two popular strands of thought with regard to African charismatic Christianity: first, “breaking with the past” (p. 17), with regard to charismatic Christianity's link to modernity; and, second, charismatic Christianity as a response to neo-liberal

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Governing Global Aeromobility

Canada and Airport Refugee Claimants in the 1980s

Bret Edwards

Canadian state and public articulated these concerns by drawing on neoliberal discourses of risk to cast many asylum seekers from the Global South as undesirable citizens. By the early part of that decade, the increasingly unpopular Liberals as well as the

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Becoming-Wolf

Or The Art of Affection in Nicolette Krebitz’s Wild

Tanja Prokić

ongoing change, something that should be considered not as following the call of the wild but as following a call of becoming-wolf , which means facing a question beyond answering: how not to be governed in a neoliberal world. Notes 1 On the