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Book Reviews

Ian Birchall, Steven Hendley, and Phyllis Morris

Noureddine Lamouchi, Jean-Paul Sartre et le tiers monde, Paris: L’Harmattan, 1996, 346 pp. ISBN 2-7384-4179-3, Ffrs.180.50 Review by Ian Birchall

Thomas R. Flynn, Sartre, Foucault, and Reason in History, Volume 1: Toward an Existentialist Theory. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1997, 340 pp., ISBN 0-226-25468-2, $18.95 (paper). Review by Steven Hendley

William L. McBride, ed., Sartre and Existentialism: Philosophy, Politics, Ethics, The Psyche, Literature, and Aesthetics, Garland Publishing. 8-volume set $583/or by volume. Toll-free (U.S.) 800-627-6273 Review by Phyllis Morris

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Sartre at One Hundred: A Man of the Nineteenth Century Addressing the Twenty-First?

Thomas R. Flynn

We are celebrating the centennial year of the birth of Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980). His death and the huge funeral cortege that spontaneously gathered on that occasion marked the passing of the last of the philosophical "personalities" of our era. Contrast, for example, his departure, which I did not witness, with that of Michel Foucault, which I did. The latter was acknowledged in a modest ceremony at the door of the Salpêtrière Hospital; his private funeral in the province was even more stark. The two passings exhibit the distinction graphically. Foucault, the most likely candidate to become Sartre's successor as reigning intellectual on the Left Bank, exited the institution that had figured in several of his books attended by a small crowd of a couple hundred, admittedly assembled without public notification, on a damp morning to hear Gilles Deleuze read a brief passage from the preface to The Uses of Pleasure. Describing philosophy as "the critical work that thought brings to bear on itself," the message had an ironically haunting Sartrean ring.

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L'expérience, le désir et l'histoire

Alain Corbin ou le «tournant culturel» silencieux

Dominique Kalifa

Il est de nombreuses façons d’envisager l’oeuvre d’Alain Corbin dans le paysage historique contemporain. On peut partir des divers objets élaborés par l’historien jusqu’ici (les sociétés et les comportements ruraux, l’histoire des sens et des appréciations, le paysage, etc.) et montrer l’étonnante capacité d’invention ou de renouvellement dont il fit preuve dans leur mise en forme. Souvent privilégiée, cette approche est évidemment pertinente, mais elle peine parfois à se dégager du simple panégyrique. On peut, de façon plus synthétique, insister sur la cohérence du projet d’ensemble (l’histoire des sensibilités), le penser dans le temps long de l’historiographie et l’inscrire dans une série de filiations (la psychologie historique de Lucien Febvre, l’histoire des mentalités façon Robert Mandrou, l’ombre portée de Michelet et du projet romantique de réanimation du passé), elles-mêmes infléchies par l’apport de sociologues comme Norbert Élias ou de philosophes comme Michel Foucault.

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Representations, History, and Wartime France

Brett Bowles

In a 1989 article published by Annales under the title “Le monde comme représentation,”1 Roger Chartier articulated a conceptual framework for bridging the gap that had traditionally separated the history of mentalities from social and political history. While the former field—pioneered by Georges Duby, Robert Mandrou, and Philippe Ariès in the 1960s—had legitimized the study of collective beliefs, anxieties, and desires as historical phenomena, the latter remained largely devoted to more concrete, easily quantifiable factors such as structures, institutions, and material culture. Drawing on the anthropological and psychoanalytical premises that had informed the work of Michel Foucault, Louis Marin, and Michel de Certeau, among others, Chartier emphasized the performative dimension of individual and collective representations in order to argue that they should be understood not only as evidence registering the exercise of social and political power, but as underlying catalysts of change in their own right. Like habitus, Pierre Bourdieu’s complex model of social causality and evolution, Chartier framed representation as a symbiotic “structuring structure” that deserved to sit at the heart of historical inquiry.

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Objects of Dispute

Planning, Discourse, and State Power in Post-War France

Edward Welch

population. Its reorganization of space, infrastructure, and living places emerges as a tangible manifestation of the state’s power over human life, defined by Michel Foucault in the 1970s as “bio-politics.” 10 That stories of state power told from the

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

, among others, connections are formed with Deleuze, Badiou, Kristeva, Lacan, Foucault, and Agamben. We can be sure that in these dark times, Sartre, were he still with us, would have provided a powerful voice reminding us of the importance of freedom

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Sartre and Heidegger on Social Deformation and the Anthropocene

Paul Gyllenhammer

our alienated sense of atomistic individuality arises. Like Foucault’s account of discipline , Sartre’s view of institution and bureaucracy is based on the pressure to conform. 48 Moreover, for both Foucault and Sartre, the threat contained within

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Book Reviews

Charles William Johns and Marcos A. Norris

, according to the twentieth-century philosopher Michel Foucault, later informed Christian attitudes on the topic of divine providence. However, because the Serenity Prayer is reducible to a few statements of practical wisdom and should not, for this reason

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Book Reviews

Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth and Nik Farrell Fox

narrative and view the trajectory of twentieth-century French philosophy with fresh eyes. This has had the effect of radically rejuvenating Sartre, bringing him out of the nineteenth century (where once Foucault disparagingly placed him) and into the twenty

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Book Reviews

John Gillespie, Kyle Shuttleworth, Nik Farrell Fox, and Mike Neary

structuralism of Barthes, Foucault, Lévi-Strauss, Lacan and Althusser, saw the primacy of individual subjectivity dismissed, the decentring of the subject and the death of the author, with Sartre being portrayed as a proponent of individualistic humanism