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Atlantics

The Ocean as Another Place

Tina Montenegro

and give dignity to those who have died. Citing Édouard Glissant's concept of opacity, she sees the ocean as a “no-answer zone,” which confers power to those who have experienced there something that is unknowable (the “s” of the title's plural is a

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The Poetic Legacy of Aimé Césaire

Francis Abiola Irele

This essay examines the centrality of Aimé Césaire's work in the emergence of a black poetic and intellectual discourse in French, and his influence, in terms both of theme and idiom, on generations of Francophone writers, an influence that can be discerned in the work of Tchikaya u Tamsi, Jean-Baptiste Tati-Loutard, Lamine Sall and Sylvie Kandé in Africa, and Frantz Fanon, Edouard Glissant, René Depestre, and Daniel Maximin in the French Caribbean region. The relationship of Césaire's work to the Créolité movement is discussed, as is the impact of his work on Anglophone Caribbean writers, such as Kamau Brathwaite of Barbados and Lansana Sekou of St Martin, as evidence of the enduring legacy of his work.

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Between Resistance and the State

Caribbean Activism and the Invention of a National Memory of Slavery in France

Itay Lotem

, who sought to challenge the political status quo. Despite references to Césaire’s Discourse on Colonialism , Edouard Glissant’s growing body of work, or the history of 350 years of colonial oppression, these activists did not prioritize the

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“White” Guadeloupeans of “Mixed” Ancestry

Complicating Analyses of Whiteness and White Supremacy

Ary Gordien

community, he agrees with Édouard Glissant's notion of creolization. Like many Guadeloupean politicians, entrepreneurs, and artists I interacted with, Isidore must certainly see in Glissant an opportunity to redefine cultural syncretism, biogenetic mixing

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Book Forum

Francio Guadeloupe, Black Man in the Netherlands: An Afro-Antillean Anthropology (Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 2022)

Dastan Abdali, Charissa Granger, Marleen de Witte, Basile Ndjio, Dave Ramsaran, Miriyam Aouragh, and Francio Guadeloupe

is not yet fully realized. Building on the scholarship of Gilroy, Stuart Hall, Édouard Glissant, and C. L. R. James, Guadeloupe interweaves his personal experiences and anthropological fieldwork to argue that: “in the Netherlands, one can discern the

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Reviews

Elizabeth Jochum, Graeme Stout, and Brian Bergen-Aurand

unknowability rather than familiarity. This idea is indebted to Édouard Glissant's notion of opacity (whom Rhee cites): “What might be necessary instead is a relation (of representation and otherwise) that insists on not just difference and the failure to

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Black Moves

Moments in the History of African-American Masculine Mobilities

Tim Cresswell

Afro-Diasporic Rhythm Cultures,” Atlantic Studies 11, no. 1 (2014): 106–124, here: 107. 38 Ibid. 39 Édouard Glissant, Poetics of Relation (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1997); Peter Fryer, Rhythms of Resistance: African Musical

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Rethinking the Margins with André Schwarz-Bart

From The Last of the Just and A Woman Named Solitude to the Posthumous Narratives

Kathleen Gyssels

Appadurai, Modernity at Large (Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 1996). 22 Edouard Glissant, Le discours antillais (Paris: Seuil, 1981), English edition Edouard Glissant, Caribbean Discourse: Selected Essays , trans. Michael Dash

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No One Can Hold It Back

The Theopolitics of Water and Life in Chilean Patagonia without Dams

Carlota McAllister

Édouard Glissant's (1997: 153) words, of “renew[ing] the visions and aesthetics of relating to the earth” from within, including reworking the relationship between the sacred and the political that the Flood instantiates. For those who lived on Baker

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Critical Thin

Haunting Sufis and the Also-Here of Migration in Berlin

Omar Kasmani

Islam's presence is expected to take shape in the European urban. In a sense, Zikr ritualizes for migrants what Édouard Glissant (1997: 190) has termed “the right to opacity.” In working against European norms of transparency, such refusal to be