Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 91 items for :

  • "NEOLIBERALISM" x
  • Media Studies x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: Articles x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Holding Up Half the Sky

Global Narratives of Girls at Risk and Celebrity Philanthropy

Angharad Valdivia

Girls figure prominently as a symbol in global discourses of philanthropy. The use of girls from the Global South lends authority and legitimacy to Western savior neoliberal impulses, in which the logic of philanthropy shifts responsibility for

Free access

Kaoru Miyazawa

Mille 1992 ). In neoliberal society, the bodies of young working-class minority women especially have been the significant sites of governance; states have various intervention programs to redeem them into being productive and reproductive citizens

Restricted access

What's a Girl to Do?

The Pleasures and Pressures of the Girls’ Night Out

Thalia Thereza Assan

Book Review Nicholls, Emily. 2019. Negotiating Femininities in the Neoliberal Night-Time Economy: Too Much of a Girl? London: Palgrave Macmillan. In this timely book, sociologist Emily Nicholls explores young women's experiences of going

Free access

Patrick Colm Hogan

It is commonplace to remark that India has the largest film industry anywhere, producing “unquestionably the most-seen movies in the world” (Kabir 2001: 1). Of the many languages in which Indian movies are made, films in Hindi (or Urdu) are the most prominent globally, and they comprise the most obviously “national” cinema (Ganti 2004: 12). Indian films in general, and Hindi films in particular, have had international success for decades (Desai 2004: 40). They constitute perhaps the only national cinema that can come close to rivaling the U.S. film industry. This parallel with Hollywood has led to the popular name for the Hindi film industry, “Bollywood.” The name refers particularly to the entertainment-oriented films from the 1960s on, and of these especially the films produced since the early 1990s in the period of economic neoliberalism and globalization.

Restricted access

Marissa C. de Baca

Erin Y. Huang. Urban Horror: Neoliberal Post-Socialism and the Limits of Visibility (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020). 288 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4780-0809-5 / 978-1-4780-0679-4; (paperback, $26.95; hardback, $99.05) Reviewed by Marissa

Free access

Smart Girl Identity

Possibilities and Implications

Bernice Loh

chapter, Raby and Pomerantz flesh out two key concepts of post-feminism and neoliberal subjectivity that they suggest frame the common narrative that being smart is a viable and easily achievable route for all girls. According to them, “post

Free access

Dayna Prest

Blank Page: Literacy, Girlhood, and Neoliberalism,” the collective biography stories on becoming literate come out of an exercise in an upper-level undergraduate women’s studies course. In this chapter, Gonick explores the intersections between literacy

Free access

Anastasia Todd

to a brief history of the relationship of youth to the nation-state, highlighting the girl as the privileged subjectivity of neoliberalism. I examine how the girl’s position as the privileged subject hinges on her potential productivity through

Restricted access

America's Favorite Doll?

Conflicting Discourses of Commodity Activism

Diana Leon-Boys

approach that describes the mechanisms by which social action is understood through, or achieved via, capitalist gains. Here, the dolls, and their stories, serve as instances of resistance within the confines of neoliberal consumption practices. Using a

Free access

Claudia Mitchell

teachers to name only three of her intersecting interests. The first of our articles is by Lisa Smith and Stephanie Paterson whose “Guiding Girls: Neoliberal Governance and Government Educational Resource Manuals in Canada” sets the scene for an issue that