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Open access

Exposed Intimacies

Clinicians on the Frontlines of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Ellen Block

show my face, whereas now I'm covered in a face mask, I have a gown from head to toe; I have to wear gloves all the time. I can't even touch them, which doesn't give you the same kind of healing presence. Quinn, the ER doctor from Rhode Island, also

Open access

Experiencing Graduated Intimacies during Lockdown (Fengcheng)

A Reflexive and Comparative Approach to the COVID-19 Pandemic in Urban China

Junjie Chen

folk notions of the body, health, and traditional healing. 4 Seeing that the city's first COVID-19 case had already been confirmed the day before, Yuecheng's municipal leaders responded immediately to the provincial government's announcement of a

Open access

Constructing the Not-So-New Normal

Ambiguity and Familiarity in Governmental Regulations of Intimacies during the Pandemic

Dmitry Kurnosov and Anna Varfolomeeva

monstrosity in order to be healed and ultimately reintegrated into society. Based on reflections on this process of hospitalisation, treatment and return to the outside world, we argue that the emerging rules of the pandemic – couched as they are in legal

Full access

Kokums to the Iskwêsisisak

COVID-19 and Urban Métis Girls and Young Women

Carly Jones, Renée Monchalin, Cheryllee Bourgeois, and Janet Smylie

knowing, being, and doing. In this article we provide an historical account of Métis Peoples’ experiences with pandemics, and the role of matrilineal Métis healing knowledges that are passed down from the grandmothers to the girls. We go on to illustrate

Free access

Claudia Mitchell and Ann Smith

girls have been left out of the national pandemic response, they continue to carry intergenerational healing knowledges that have been passed down from the kokums (grandmas) to the iskwêsisisak (girls).” They describe the “innovative and community

Free access

“If the coronavirus doesn’t kill us, hunger will”

Regional absenteeism and the Wayuu permanent humanitarian crisis

Claudia Puerta Silva, Esteban Torres Muriel, Roberto Carlos Amaya Epiayú, Alicia Dorado González, Fatima Epieyú, Estefanía Frías Epinayú, Álvaro Ipuana Guariyü, Miguel Ramírez Boscán, and Jakeline Romero Epiayú

and survival When the news of COVID-19 began, a healer from Alta Guajira announced her dream, that all the Wayuu communities should dance yonna , 9 the typical Wayuu dance. Most Wayuu followed these instructions for COVID-19 treatment and

Open access

Marla Frederick, Yunus Doğan Telliel, and Heather Mellquist Lehto

. The screens become transformed theologically into prosthetics of the pastor, allowing him or her to perform the Pentecostal healing ritual of ‘laying on of hands’ despite the fact that the healed congregant's body is often an ocean away from the pastor

Open access

Museums in the Pandemic

A Survey of Responses on the Current Crisis

Joanna Cobley, David Gaimster, Stephanie So, Ken Gorbey, Ken Arnold, Dominique Poulot, Bruno Brulon Soares, Nuala Morse, Laura Osorio Sunnucks, María de las Mercedes Martínez Milantchí, Alberto Serrano, Erica Lehrer, Shelley Ruth Butler, Nicky Levell, Anthony Shelton, Da (Linda) Kong, and Mingyuan Jiang

presents a fundamental role for the museum sector in networks of formal health and social care. Museums and the arts provide some of the vital resources we will need to heal after the pandemic. There will likely be an outpouring of the language of care