Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 27 items for :

  • Open access x
Clear All
Open access

Call for Papers

Feminist Movements across the Board (A Critical Analysis)

Barbara Franchi, Natália S. Perez, and Giovanni A. Travaglino

Feminist movements have had a fundamental impact on social life in many different parts of the world. Reforms in marriage and private property laws, as well as change in spheres as diverse as sexual life, contraception, and the work-place have had profound consequences on the way we conceptualize, act and signify gender relations. Feminist thinkers and activists have also brought attention to the impact that the intersectionality of racism, heterosexism, poverty and religious intolerance (among many other factors) can have in people’s lives.

Open access

Julien Brachet, Victoria L. Klinkert, Cory Rodgers, Robtel Neajai Pailey, Elieth Eyebiyi, Rachel Benchekroun, Grzegorz Micek, Natasha N. Iskander, Aydan Greatrick, Alexandra Bousiou, and Anne White

racism and xenophobia as well as the cosmopolitan communitas that has emerged across perceived divisions. The next four ethnographic chapters describe specific issues facing entrepreneurs in Eastleigh: the establishment of businesses and accumulation of

Open access

Anxiety and learning

Cultural polarisation in social science courses

Jose Leonardo Santos

willingness to treat the actions of partisan opponents as legitimate’ ( Iyengar and Westwood 2015: 705 ). Experiments found affective polarisation had an even more divisive effect than racism, since people would attempt to self-correct racist tendencies, but

Open access

Places of Otherness

Comparing Eastleigh, Nairobi, and Xiaobei, Guangzhou, as Sites of South-South Migration

Neil Carrier and Gordon Mathews

). Chinese racism against Africans is well-documented ( Cheng 2011 ; Sautman 1994 ), although how much it is due to skin color and how much to the perceived poverty of those of a given skin color remains an open question. On the internet racism is apparent

Open access

Introduction

Exceptionalism and Necropolitical Security Dynamics in Olympic Rio de Janeiro

Margit Ystanes and Tomas Salem

democracy often used to negate the existence of racism in Brazil. In their work, this myth is foundational for the ideology of white domination in the country. It acts to conceal, or to “camouflage” (Pauschinger, this issue), racism in Brazil through a

Open access

Ethnographic witnessing

Or, hope is the first anthropological emotion

Carole McGranahan

in the United States, people are angry. They are angry and scared about the pandemic. People are angry at political leaders for ineffective, unethical responses to the pandemic. People are outraged at ongoing police violence and racism. They are

Open access

Editorial

‘But No One Died’: A Brief Reflection on Place and Time

Edited by Christine McCourt

; the privatisation of local government services; the drive for deregulation no matter the human cost; the racism that perpetuates inferior infrastructure and safety standards for people of colour; and the erasure of the voices and interests of working

Open access

Public Health in Eastern Europe

Visible Modernization and Elusive Gender Transformation

Evguenia Davidova

; eating habits and alcoholism; specific illnesses that afflicted the rural population (pellagra); and racial degeneration. It was the latter that coalesced anxieties of depopulation with nationalism, racism, and anti-Semitism. Within this amalgam

Open access

Emergent Police States

Racialized Pacification and Police Moralism from Rio's Favelas to Bolsonaro

Tomas Salem and Bjørn Enge Bertelsen

first decades of the 1800s register no arrests of white Europeans, as Rio's police forces were conceived to protect the interests of the white, wealthy elite and to uphold a national order founded on slavery and racism ( Holloway 1993 ). Consequently

Open access

Whose Reality Counts?

Emergent Dalitbahujan Anthropologists

Reddi Sekhara Yalamala

, racism and male dominance are not inevitable; that it would be possible to have a world in which these things would not exist, and that we'd all be better off as a result’ ( Graeber 2004: 10 ; see Yalamala 2011 , 2013 ). This recognition is germinating