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Blurred memories

War and disaster in a Buddhist Sinhala village

Mara Benadusi

like a silent enemy into the core of the enduring process of “securitization of fear” ( Hyndman 2007 ) in Sri Lanka. Yet, however much the politics of memory tends to cloud matters, the article shows that it never goes uncontested, as long as subjects

Open access

Places of Otherness

Comparing Eastleigh, Nairobi, and Xiaobei, Guangzhou, as Sites of South-South Migration

Neil Carrier and Gordon Mathews

view both of these neighborhoods with trepidation as well as with a degree of attraction: just as Kenyans both fear Eastleigh and buy goods in Eastleigh, so too many Chinese in Guangzhou view Xiaobei with apprehension as a site of developing

Open access

Mette Louise Berg, Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, and Johanna Waters

team, 2020 has brought significant barriers. We have feared for the safety of our loved ones; grieved unbearable losses, often from afar; faced different forms of containment; and sought to, somehow, find the time and energy to care for our loved ones

Open access

Museums in the Pandemic

A Survey of Responses on the Current Crisis

Joanna Cobley, David Gaimster, Stephanie So, Ken Gorbey, Ken Arnold, Dominique Poulot, Bruno Brulon Soares, Nuala Morse, Laura Osorio Sunnucks, María de las Mercedes Martínez Milantchí, Alberto Serrano, Erica Lehrer, Shelley Ruth Butler, Nicky Levell, Anthony Shelton, Da (Linda) Kong, and Mingyuan Jiang

Introduction Building Cultural Resilience: We Are in This Together, and It Is Not Over Yet Throughout human history, the spread of disease has closed borders, restricted civic movement, and fueled fear of the unknown; yet at the same time

Open access

On Money and Quarantine

A Self-Ethnography from Italy

Francesca Messineo

value to us. Money bills and coins particularly attracted my fears, and I started to see them as potentially infected entities entering my safe space made out of hygienic procedures and obsessive cleaning. As a consequence, cash was removed from my

Open access

Familial Intimacy and the ‘Thing’ between Us

Cuddle Curtains and Desires for Detached Relationality in Germany, Austria and Switzerland

Andreas Streinzer, Almut Poppinga, Carolin Zieringer, Anna Wanka, and Georg Marx

of affection, cuddling and chuckling sparked hope amongst many that familial hugs could once again return during the strict lockdowns in these countries (DACH), 1 which were the countries that our project aimed to study. 2 Fears about the End of

Open access

Physically Distant – Socially Intimate

Reflecting on Public Performances of Resistance in a Pandemic Situation

Marion Hamm

. Along with remembrance of the anti-fascist struggle evoked by the song ‘Bella Ciao’, the clips brought the painful dimension of pandemic-induced separation and isolation to the fore, but also conveyed a sense of defiance: of the deadly illness, the fear

Open access

Afterword

The Elsewhere beyond Religious Concerns

Annalisa Butticci and Amira Mittermaier

We are all connected to multiple Elsewheres: the place(s) where we grew up, the place we would rather be, the places that haunt us, the places where the dead dwell, the sites of empire. Geographical Elsewheres can be a source of fear. In the wake

Open access

Sheila K. Hoffman

invariably decline ( Anderson 1996 ; Cody 1997 ; Wallace 1995 ). In the 25 years since, that fear has largely been dispelled even as our technical ability to digitally capture and disseminate cultural collections has improved exponentially, even to the

Open access

The Boy on the Beach

The Fragility of Canada's Discourses on the Syrian Refugee "Crisis

Petra Molnar

The contours of Canadian refugee policies have in recent years fluctuated from a narrative of 'bogus' refugees requiring a tough approach of interdiction to one of urgent humanitarian assistance. These rapid discursive shifts highlight the fragility of how Canada's humanitarian responses, and its place in the world, are conceptualized. Using the case study of Canada's responses to the Syrian conflict, this short paper argues that state responses must be critically interrogated in order to move away from homogenizing narratives grounded in tropes such as ‘fear’, ‘floods’ and ‘crisis’, which continue to impact how state, media, and public discourse handle the influx of refugees. Examining how the Canadian state performs its sovereignty in response to the Syrian conflict is instructive to reveal its broader nation-building projects, ones which utilize particular tropes of fear to justify suspicion and exclusion of bodies that have been cast as dangerous and uncontrollable. While Canada is once again presenting itself as a global leader in refugee and human rights issues, it remains to be seen whether these more humane policies can withstand the continuing millennial border anxieties of the West when facing the prospect of resettling increasingly large numbers of refugees.