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Open access

Andrew Dawson

personal nationalisms ( Cohen 1996 ), the relationship between national identities within oneself. In the manner of so much lockdown anthropology, this is an auto-ethnography ( Reed-Danahay 1997 ), which considers my experience of being an immigrant from

Open access

Haptic Mediations

Intergenerational Kinship in the Time of COVID-19

Bob Simpson

domain of mutuality, obligation and affect that we think of as kinship. In this article, I want to reflect on some of these implications for the practice and expression of intergenerational kinship relations. I do this by way of a brief exercise in auto-ethnography

Open access

Whose Reality Counts?

Emergent Dalitbahujan Anthropologists

Reddi Sekhara Yalamala

Abstract

The low caste, Dalit and Tribal social movements in India have reconfigured the fabric of Indian society in significant ways over the past decade. Likewise, the movement of these same groups into anthropology, a discipline previously dominated in India by upper-caste intellectuals, has created a dynamic force for change in the academy. At a time when India is vying with the global economic powers for supremacy, the people severely affected are low caste, Dalits and Tribal peoples, who see their lands being lost and their lifestyles in rapid transformation. Some from these same groups are also witnessing some of their daughters and sons pursuing higher studies and entering into the social sciences. The entry of these young scholars not only challenges the caste-based status quo in the academy, but it also forces these scholars to question their own position in relation to these social movements and in relation to Indian society more broadly.

Open access

Porous Bodies

Corporeal Intimacies, Disgust and Violence in a COVID-19 World

Cynthia Sear

Abstract

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the way we imagine and experience our bodily boundaries. While previously we may have believed our body to be discrete and bounded by our skin, the latest medical advice has awakened us to the porous nature of our bodies. The virus, we have learnt, may enter our body through our mouths, nose and eyeballs via the surfaces that we touch and through the air that we breathe. In this article, I employ auto-ethnographic reflections and recent media coverage to argue that this new corporeal intimacy has both produced and revealed new and latent experiences of disgust and violence.

Open access

Michael Alexander Ulfstjerne

Abstract

This article explores virtual common singing in the time of partial lockdown in Denmark through an auto-ethnographic account. The phenomenon of singing together on Danish public service television gained immense popularity as a response to the pandemic as one-fifth of the population tuned in, in many cases broadcasting themselves while signing. Looking at common singing as an emergent ‘infrastructure for troubling times’, this article takes up questions of digitally mediated intimacy during the COVID-19 lockdown, exploring who sings, what is sung, and the affective responses (tears, feelings of intimacy, ambivalence) to the singing. More than merely reviving vernacular singing traditions, the article argues, this new-found sonic comradery forms not only an affective infrastructure that moves people to tears but also somatic building blocks for national imageries.

Open access

Marcos Farias Ferreira, Máiréad Nic Craith, Markéta Slavková, Linda M. Mülli, Mariann Vaczi, Annika Lems, and Işıl Karataş

summer of 2014. By applying an auto-ethnographic approach, Lewicki introduces and describes the EU-space in Brussels with detailed ethnographic descriptions of his visits to the field of research and encounters with fieldwork interlocutors in the first

Open access

Andrew Dawson and Simone Dennis

that engage directly with informants ‘in the field’. However, and inevitably because of the conditions of lockdown faced by many of the contributors, a good many of the articles are auto-ethnographies, ‘netnographic’ studies ( Kozinets 1998 ), or

Open access

Constructing the Not-So-New Normal

Ambiguity and Familiarity in Governmental Regulations of Intimacies during the Pandemic

Dmitry Kurnosov and Anna Varfolomeeva

This article is primarily based on our auto-ethnographic narratives as COVID-19 patients witnessing shifts of policies and practices governing our treatment. During the period of hospitalisation, we experienced a set of changing measures and practices

Open access

Fieldwork through the Zoomiverse

Sensing Uganda in a Time of Immobility

Richard Vokes and Gertrude Atukunda

town or a village – had fallen into broadly similar rhythms. Yet beyond this kind of intimate auto-ethnography, what did our assemblage of methods reveal in relation to our wider project on roads and mobilities? Important here were the daily walks

Open access

Andrew Dawson and Simone Dennis

communication and engaging in desired intimacies with others. What emerges is that what the pandemic lockdown brings is lost intimacy and a sense of homelessness within homes. In contrast, in their auto-ethnographic observations of their mediated