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Active learning in criminal justice

The benefits of student investigation of wrongful convictions in a higher education setting

Jill Dealey

Advocates of active learning in higher education applaud the use of approaches that encourage student involvement in research and inquiry and state that it is the most effective means of enabling a move away from more traditional (and now less

Open access

Shih-Hsiung Liu

information ( Rogoff 1990 ; Vygotsky 1978 ). Teacher education students who undertake dialogue-based learning for education-related topics may potentially develop a more profound understanding than students who do not. Dialogue-based peer learning (DBPL

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Anxiety and learning

Cultural polarisation in social science courses

Jose Leonardo Santos

confusion, then terror, then tears. Something about these issues triggered her. I felt bad. Later, I wondered how emotional responses influence learning. If this student was so shaken by the class topic, could she have truly absorbed lessons about

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Penny Welch and Susan Wright

In this issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences , authors from Denmark, the United States, Taiwan and the United Kingdom analyse serendipity in anthropology teaching, the use of lecture

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Barbara Robertson and Mark J. Flowers

the learning management system as a supplement to the traditional lecture already given ( Bollmeier et al. 2010 ; Bryans Bongey et al. 2006 ; Choi and Johnson 2005 ; Cramer et al. 2007 ; Evans 2014 ; Maag 2004 ; Rogers and Cordell 2011 ; Rose

Open access

Sam Pryke

articles on Socrative use in higher education that have been published in teaching and learning journals over the last seven years, in itself a reflection of the popularity of the Web-based platform. In doing so, I also make some reference to the

Open access

Sarah B. Rodriguez

and undergraduate students conducting research in global health – including knowing the limits of their training and realising they are foremost conducting research as a learning experience – there are also some unique concerns when undergraduates from

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Minestrone Stories

Teaching anthropology through serendipitous cultural exchanges

Regnar Kristensen

participating in a series of indirect cultural exchanges. What began as a social project also thus came to structure a rather unusual teaching and learning experiment. Minestrone Stories (in Danish Minestronefortællinger ), as the project was called, gained

Open access

Learning in Collaborative Moments

Practising Relating Differently with Dementia in Dialogue Meetings

Silke Hoppe, Laura Vermeulen, Annelieke Driessen, Els Roding, Marije de Groot, and Kristine Krause

In this article, we describe experiences with dialogue evenings within a research collaboration on long-term care and dementia in the Netherlands. What started as a conventional process of ‘reporting back’ to interlocutors transformed over the course of two years into learning and knowing together. We argue that learning took place in three different articulations. First, participants learnt to expand their notion of knowledge. Second, they learnt to relate differently to each other and, therewith, to dementia. And third, participants learnt how to generate knowledge with each other. We further argue that these processes did not happen continuously, but in moments. We suggest that a framework of collaborative moments can be helpful for research projects that are not set up collaboratively from the start. Furthermore, we point to the work required to facilitate these moments.

Open access

Creating a reflective space in higher education

The case of a Swedish course for professional principals

Katina Thelin

This article considers the conditions, possibilities, and challenges of creating what is referred to here as a ‘reflective space’ within a higher education course for principals. It is informed by the findings of a qualitative research inquiry conducted in the interests of enhancing the principals’ learning and professional praxis and the university educators’ pedagogical praxis, within a Swedish course for school and preschool principals. Analysis of the findings highlighted two significant patterns. The first relates to the transformative benefits of creating a ‘reflective space’ for the principals attending the course. The second is more ambiguous and reflects their relation to and engagement with scientifically constructed knowledge. Based on these findings, the article offers considerations relevant for creating ‘reflective spaces’ as a means to enhance the quality of learning in higher education. Additionally, some guiding pedagogical implications are included in the final remarks.