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Open access

Sensory Perception of Rock Art in East Siberia and the Far East

Soviet Archeological “Discoveries” and Indigenous Evenkis

Donatas Brandišauskas

intentions of ancient artists. He also believed that such an artistic performance reflected the attempts of the painter to help people “fill life with beauty,” “humanistic features,” and “nobility.” According to Okladnikov, when archaeologists copied drawings

Open access

Gender and Empire

The Imprisonment of Women in Eighteenth-Century Siberia

Gwyn Bourlakov

system that extracted resources from the periphery. An examination of gender performance, and the transitional moral and legal expectations of elite women in the eighteenth-century Russian society can help scholars understand deeper meanings of female

Open access

Marcos Farias Ferreira, Máiréad Nic Craith, Markéta Slavková, Linda M. Mülli, Mariann Vaczi, Annika Lems, and Işıl Karataş

develop his engagement in the everydayness of social relations constituting today's Estonia – through conversations, artistic performances, interpretive reflections, or mere daily life roles – thereby allowing the reader to go beyond conceptual and

Open access

Stiletto Socialism

Social Class, Dressing Up, and Women's Self-Positioning in Socialist Slovenia

Polona Sitar

positions. According to Erving Goffman, social status is not a material thing that is possessed and displayed, but a pattern of proper performance, whether it occurs in an elegant or embarrassing way. 62 To provide a more multifaceted reflection on social

Open access

Masculinity on Stage

Dueling in the Greek Capital, 1870–1918

Dimitra Vassiliadou

violence, and emotion attracted social and cultural historians, who highlighted its profound connection to an array of masculine competitive attributes and performances. 14 As stated, despite their socioeconomic status all people possessed some sense of

Open access

Marco Solimene, Mariann Vaczi, Paul Manning, Bozena Sojka, Stephen Quilley, Anna Zhelnina, and Aimar Ventsel

performance. Chapter 7 discusses sport and nationalism through the popular perspectives of ‘imagined communities’, ‘invented traditions’ and ‘banal nationalism’. Chapter 8 situates sport in an international and globalised context, with special attention to the

Open access

Narva as Method

Urban Inventories and the Mutation of the Postsocialist City

Francisco Martínez

states and also indolence and an existential search for meaning. Post-traumatic stress disorder can be both driven and expressed through the materiality of the city, in the form of negative material performance, empty apartments or crumbling façades

Open access

Maria Bucur, Alexandra Ghit, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Ivana Pantelić, Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild, Elizabeth A. Wood, Anna Müller, Galina Goncharova, Zorana Antonijević, Katarzyna Sierakowska, Andrea Feldman, Maria Kokkinou, Alexandra Zavos, Marija M. Bulatović, Siobhán Hearne, and Rayna Gavrilova

, intellectual interest, performance, and political debate, and how they eventually destroyed their own experiment. The author takes as a model for the history of this tight-knit group Marci Shore's Caviar and Ashes , which similarly followed the complicated and

Open access

Instead of a Novel

Sophia Yablonska's Travelogues in the History of Modern Ukrainian Literature

Olena Haleta

Berber fabulist as a show and a performance; she does not understand his words or care that she does not: He drew the attention of the spectators with nothing else but his facial expressions and body movements. Many Arabs in the crowd were not able to

Open access

Adriana Zaharijević, Kristen Ghodsee, Efi Kanner, Árpád von Klimó, Matthew Stibbe, Tatiana Zhurzhenko, Žarka Svirčev, Agata Ignaciuk, Sophia Kuhnle, Ana Miškovska Kajevska, Chiara Bonfiglioli, Marina Hughson, Sanja Petrović Todosijević, Enriketa Papa-Pandelejmoni, Stanislava Barać, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Selin Çağatay, and Agnieszka Mrozik

acts of performance (supposedly passive “nonacts,” like standing motionless in the public, are, in fact, performative) constantly bring the past back into “our” time, thereby unsettling its smooth archiving into an unambiguous, single, and hegemonic