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Annabel Erulkar and Girmay Medhin

resulted in an increasing number of initiatives developed to support girls, especially in poorer countries. Many of the programs for marginalized girls employ what are known as safe spaces—sometimes referred to as child friendly spaces—that are places in

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Girls, Homelessness, and COVID-19

The Urgent Need for Research and Action

Kaitlin Schwan, Erin Dej, and Alicia Versteegh

triangulation of these bodies of research raises the question of whether the pandemic may create a pipeline into housing precarity and homelessness for low-income or marginalized girls in Canada, some of whom were previously housed, while further entrenching

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Claudia Mitchell and Ann Smith

ensure the wellbeing of transgirls and notes that “more research is needed to understand marginalized girls’ experiences when things fall apart.” Reporting on research done in Bangladesh and Jordan, Sarah Baird, Sarah Alheiwidi, Rebecca Dutton, Khadija

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Working Hard, Hanging Back

Constructing the Achieving Girl

Colette Slagle

how conceptions of genius inform the present day. She notes that genius has been used to marginalize girls and women at each stage by setting the solitary innate boy genius in opposition to the collaborative hardworking girl. She conveys how these

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Editorial

Girlhood Studies at 10

Claudia Mitchell

groups led by mentors.” They conclude that “[g]irls-only safe spaces programs can be effective at improving literacy and health-seeking behavior among … marginalized girls.” We conclude this issue with book reviews by Crystal Leigh Endsley and Elspeth

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A Call to Action

Creativity and Black Girlhood

Crystal Leigh Endsley

connecting it to the larger machine of systemic inequality. Brown knows that there are dangers for marginalized girls in exposing their stories to an audience that may not be what I think of as black-girl-literate. Her first chapter includes her own story and

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Personal, Powerful, Political

Activist Networks by, for, and with Girls and Young Women

Catherine Vanner and Anuradha Dugal

patriarchy, racism, and other discriminatory structures ( Bergmann and Ossewaarde 2020 ; Walters 2016 ). There remains a stubborn process of making girls—particularly girls of color and other socially marginalized girls— invisible in public discourse and in

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Call-and-Response

Looking Outward from/with IGSA@ND

Angeletta KM Gourdine, Mary Celeste Kearney, and Shauna Pomerantz

gendered middle-class discourse is not accessible to marginalized girls, however, since feminist movements focus primarily on middle-class women, leaving girls in secure care to shoulder the responsibility for resolving situations shaped by structures

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Paula MacDowell

transgress their doubly insubordinate status in the media sphere. Both gender and generational dynamics have historically marginalized girls’ involvement ( Mitchell 2015 ; Wajcman 1998 ). Hence, in this section I offer the complete transcript of The Media

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Girl, Interrupted and Continued

Rethinking the Influence of Elena Fortún’s Celia

Ana Puchau de Lecea

literature prize and emerged as one of the most important writers in Spain, challenging the conventions of the popular romance novel and reincorporating the figure of the marginalized girl whom Fortún had portrayed in her stories. In contrast to the first