Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Appetite for Discovery

Sense and Sentiment in the Early Modern World

Jennifer Hillman

Lucien Febvre’s 1941 call for historians to recover the histoire des sentiments is now routinely evoked by scholars in the wake of the recent “emotional turn” in the historical discipline. Historians would regain their “appetite for discovery” (goût à l’exploration) once they delved into the deepest recesses of the discipline, where history meets psychology, Febvre predicted. His plea followed the aims of a generation of scholars working in the early twentieth century—Johan Huizinga and Norbert Elias among them—who sought to recapture the affective lives of the past. Yet the history of sense and sentiment perhaps owes its greatest debt to Febvre and his colleagues in the Annales School, who, via the study of mentalités and private life, made the study of emotions a serious object of historical inquiry. Some four decades passed before Febvre’s challenge was taken up with any rigor. In the 1980s, the work of Peter and Carol Z. Stearns sought to chart the emotional standards and co des of past societies—something they termed “emotionology.” Since then, over the past three decades the history of emotions has been pioneered by scholars such as Barbara H. Rosenwein and William Reddy in seminal works that introduced us to now classic interpretative frameworks such as “emotional communities” and “emotives.” This burgeoning of interest in the history of emotions has now also found expression in a number of institutional research centers and publication series devoted to the subject.

Free access

Introduction

France’s Great War from the Edge

Susan B. Whitney

decades, to the adoption of approaches from social and labor history during the 1970s and 1980s and from cultural history in the 1990s and 2000s. Both articles noted contemporary explorations of experience. 1 The war's impact on women and gender roles and

Free access

Nicholas L. Syrett

—most identify the late 1970s and 1980s as a key turning point—when it was often used as a catch-all for any desire for minors. Nevertheless, whether or not they were able to identify with a diagnostic category, it is clear that some men have well understood

Free access

Rethinking World War I

Occupation, Liberation, and Reconstruction

George Robb and W. Brian Newsome

” of the war but also because, like propaganda posters, their visual imagery reflected long-standing tropes about civilization and barbarism. The next two articles focus on issues of gender. Since the 1980s this subject has been a major concern of World

Free access

Katherine Weikert and Elena Woodacre

In January 2014, the University of Winchester hosted the Gender and Medieval Studies conference. Held sporadically since the late 1980s and, for the most part, annually in the last fifteen years, the conference series is dedicated to the study of