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Eric S. Rabkin

Frankenstein and Dracula represent two different genres in print but only one in film. The emergence of science fiction from the Gothic exemplifies normal public genre development. The translation of the written Frankenstein and Dracula into film exemplifies genre development as an adaptation both to historical moment and to medium. In both the print and film cases, we can see the same mechanisms by which a genre is not only established in the public sphere but in the mind of a reader or viewer, a dialectic process in which the genre forms and informs reading and viewing and potentially, as a genre, is reformed by reading and viewing. Consideration of cognitive mechanisms involved in verbal and visual cognition shows both the interaction and the typical dominance of the visual, although genre, and hence individual works, can be modified by increasing our focus on the verbal.

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How to Survive the Postfeminist Impasse

Grace Helbig’s Affective Aesthetics

Catherine McDermott

YouTube tutorial, or how-to video, and explore how she affectively deflates the fantasy of fun-loving confident femininity constructed by postfeminist genres. Through an analysis of Helbig’s affective aesthetics, I explore the ways in which how-to videos

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Boris Maslov

abstractions by their function within a poetic genre—the Pindaric ode—whose structure, to a large extent, dictates the meaning of the text. While the history of political thought tends to regard its objects of study as pieces of intellectual property acquired

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Less Than One But More Than Many

Anthropocene as Science Fiction and Scholarship-in-the-Making

Heather Anne Swanson, Nils Bubandt, and Anna Tsing

How might one responsibly review a field just coming into being—such as that provoked by the term Anthropocene? In this article, we argue for two strategies. First, working from the premise that the Anthropocene field is best understood within its emergence, we review conferences rather than publications. In conference performances, we glimpse the themes and tensions of a field-to-come. Second, we interpret Anthropocene as a science-fiction concept, that is, one that pulls us out of familiar space and time to view our predicaments differently. This allows us to explore emergent figurations, genres, and practices for the transdisciplinary study of real and imagined worlds framed by human disturbance. In the interplay and variation across modes for constructing this field, Anthropocene scholarship finds its shape.

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Introduction

Literature of the Thirties – Region and Genre

Mary Joannou

The second special issue on the literature of the thirties follows on from an earlier edition of Critical Survey which brought together new critical writings on the period (volume 10, number 3, 1988). The first four essays selected are responses to regionalism and identity and the last two to the issues raised by the relationships of gender and generic fiction. Simon Featherstone analyses how two popular artistes, Gracie Fields (the ‘mill girl’) and Max Miller (‘the cheeky chappie’) achieved success in an entertainment industry that was changing rapidly in response to technological and cultural pressures. Their stardom depended on the dialogues between regional and national identities as part of a national cultural dynamic during a decade in which mass popular forms reconstituted the older regional and local traditions of dialogue and performance. Steven Matthews sees Auden’s injunction to ‘Consider this and in our time’ as a ‘clarion call to a particular, post-The Waste Land, form of modernity’. Focusing on Scottish and Irish writers (Louis MacNeice, Sorley Maclean, Grassic Gibbon et al.) Matthews argues that the temporality of some thirties’ writing aligns it closely with the emergent nationalisms familiar in recent postcolonial theory.

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Instead of a Novel

Sophia Yablonska's Travelogues in the History of Modern Ukrainian Literature

Olena Haleta

-Soviet version of the history of literature, which also includes Ukrainain literature, is still influenced by the socialist realist model dominated by the idea that the novel is the central literary genre and that it develops one overarching “master plot” (not

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The Girl

Dead

Fiona Nelson

parents of any child might find something to worry about in it, but this book needs to be considered in the context of an entire genre of YA fiction that is telling a particular story about girls’ lives and deaths. I would argue that the Netflix adaptation

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Introduction

Print Culture, Mobility, and The Pacific, 1920–1950

Victoria Kuttainen and Susann Liebich

range of genres, by paying attention to readers and reception, and by focusing on actual mobility and its representation as well as the mediation between the two. The articles consider a variety of print forms, including newspapers, magazines, and books

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Ekaterina B. Tolmacheva

chronological order of when they were taken, that is connect them with the route of the researcher. However, I am more interested here in Poliakov’s work methods than his route. Therefore, it is more convenient to classify the documents by genre. Such grouping

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Anne Magnussen

published during the 1970s but was not part of the fanzine movement. It belonged to the genre of historical comics that were considerably less loud than the fanzines and that did not break with children’s comics in the same way as they did. A stereotyped