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Albert I. Baumgarten

introduces and presents the English original of the preface Dame Mary Douglas (1921–2007) wrote for the Hebrew translation of Purity and Danger , which appeared in 2010 as part of the Libido (Sociology/Anthropology) Translation Series, published by Resling

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Texts in Dialogue

Introduction

The International Jewish Christian Bible Week, which is dedicated mainly to the study of the Hebrew Scriptures, includes two sessions called ‘Texts in Dialogue’, usually devoted to reflection by a Jew and a Christian on a New Testament text, or

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Dr Eric L. Friedland z'l

(20 January 1940–16 January 2020)

Andrew Goldstein

Hebrew Teachers College in Boston. Here was founded his deep and wide Jewish knowledge, as all lessons were taught in Hebrew. He graduated from Brookline High School in 1957 and from Boston University in 1960. Eric pursued doctoral studies at Brandeis

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Cacher, festive et végétarienne

La nouvelle cuisine des fêtes juives

Sophie Nizard

le Rabbin Arthur Green (Professeur au Hebrew College de Boston), dans un article intitulé « Vegetarianism : An Alternative Kashrut » ( Green s.d. ), rappelle que la tradition juive, pour des raisons morales et spirituelles, récuse la violence et la

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Jonathan Magonet

Jews were designated as the ‘People of the Book’ in the Qur’an and we have been happy to adopt the title. It meant that, like Muslims, we had been the recipients of a divine revelation cast in the form of the written word. The designation is correct, but we might argue about what precisely that ‘book’ is. In one sense it is the Hebrew Bible, or more specifically, the written Torah, the Five Books of Moses. However from its outset rabbinic Judaism drew its authority from another ‘book’, originally perceived as the ‘oral Torah’, the oral tradition that accompanied the revelation at Mt. Sinai. It found its concrete expression within the Mishnah and Talmud, recording the arguments and decisions of emerging rabbinic Judaism. So the Talmud is the ‘book’ of received tradition that defined what constituted the Hebrew Bible itself, and virtually every aspect of Jewish life.

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Hilary Pomeroy

The eleven articles in this issue of European Judaism reflect the social and religious culture of Moroccan Jews set against an ever changing backdrop of persecution and conflict, interaction and cohabitation. Ranging from Berber Jews to forced converts, scholars, courtiers and artisans, Moroccan Jews were constantly under threat. Despite this unstable situation, they produced literary and religious works in Hebrew, Judeo-Arabic and Judeo-Spanish as well as creating distinctive life-cycle customs, songs and a highly skilled material culture. While the Jewish community of Morocco is today considerably reduced, Moroccan immigrants in Israel, France and the Americas keep the memory and identity of Jewish Morocco alive.

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Ariel Friedlander, Michal Friedlander, Noam Friedlander, Lionel Blue, Eveline Goodman-Thau, Paul Oestreicher, Thomas Salamon, Tony Bayfield, Sidney Brichto, Michael Shire, and Jane Clements

Albert Hoschander Friedlander, rabbi: born Berlin 10 May 1927; ordained rabbi 1952; Rabbi, United Hebrew Congregation, Fort Smith, Arkansas 1952–56; Rabbi, Temple B’nai Brith, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 1956–61; Religious Counsellor, Columbia University 1961–66; Founder Rabbi, Jewish Center of the Hamptons, East Hampton, New York 1961–66; Rabbi, Wembley Liberal Synagogue 1966–71; Lecturer, Leo Baeck College 1967–71, Director 1971–82, Dean 1982–2004; Senior Rabbi, Westminster Synagogue 1971–97 (Rabbi Emeritus); Editor, European Judaism 1982–2004; OBE 2001; President, Council of Christians and Jews 2003–04; married 1961 Evelyn Philipp (three daughters); died London 8 July 2004.

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The positive feedback we have received since the appearance of the first issue of the (renamed) Israel Studies Review last May has exceeded our expectations, and we are grateful to everyone who responded. Of course, we have built on the work of the previous Editorial Board and the support of the Association for Israel Studies. We are appreciative that the innovations we introduced, including the Forum section and the review essays of books published in a particular field in Hebrew, have received such approbation. We encourage all of our readers and friends to continue sending us more ideas for topics, sections, and issues to deal with.

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Rachel Werczberger and Boaz Huss

On 17 June 2014, in the heart of the Etzion Bloc (Gush Etzion) in the West Bank, the site of the abduction of three Israeli teens by Palestinian terrorists the week before, an unusual event took place. Several Jewish-Israeli and Palestinian peace activists, a few rabbis, and a Muslim Sufi sheikh gathered in order to pray for the safe return of the kidnapped youths. The group prayed both in Hebrew and Arabic, reciting psalms and Quran-based Muslim prayers. “Our hearts are torn at this moment, and my heart goes out the mothers of these children,” said Sheikh Ibrahim Abu Al-Hawa, before reciting the first chapter of the Quran, the Fatiha. He continued, “There is a wall between our two nations, and we hope to remove the wall separating the hearts of humans” (Miller 2014). He concluded his speech by proclaiming “God is One” in Arabic and Hebrew, followed by the young Rabbi Yossi Froman (son of the late Rabbi Menachem Froman), who stood beside him.

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Jonathan Magonet

The Book of Esther hardly needs an introduction. However, at first glance it is easy to dismiss it as belonging to the kind of extravagant storytelling we associate with the oriental world, something out of the ‘Thousand and One Nights’. Nevertheless, we must be careful not to project our western prejudices onto this kind of literature, which, in its own way, seeks to instruct as well as entertain. Within the Hebrew Bible the Book of Esther might be classified as wisdom literature, illustrating how a wise man turns the tables on his deadly enemy in the struggle for power in a world of palace intrigues. Moreover, it is especially significant as the only book to be set in the diaspora, exploring the implications of this new reality of exile with its opportunities and dangers.