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Sensory Perception of Rock Art in East Siberia and the Far East

Soviet Archeological “Discoveries” and Indigenous Evenkis

Donatas Brandišauskas

whole up to the present time ( Brandišauskas 2017 ). 1 These sites can be seen as being linked to the ideas of animism as well as human interactions with spirits and animals (see Brandišauskas 2011 ). During my field research in the Republic of Sakha

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Local legacies of the GULag in Siberia

Anthropological reflections

Marjorie Mandelstam Balzer

This essay, based on field notes from 1976 to 2013, explores resonances of the GULag and exile system in Siberia, focusing on often ignored indigenous peoples in villages and towns. Interethnic relations, diverse community relationships with prison camps, and dynamics of Russian Orthodox and pre-Christian spirituality are explored. Debates about how to understand, teach, and memorialize the significance of the Stalinist system are analyzed, as are issues of shame, moral debilitation, and cultural revitalization. Featured cases include the Khanty of West Siberia, Sibiriaki of West and East Siberia, plus Éveny, Évenki, Yukagir, and Sakha of the Sakha Republic (Yakutia). The author argues that what local people have chosen to emphasize as they reflect on and process the GULag varies greatly with their and their ancestors' specific experiences of the camps and exiles, as well as with their degrees of indigeneity.

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Anna Edmundson, Margo Neale, Michèle Rivet, Brett Mason, Katie Kyung, Rebecca Gibson, Alison K. Brown, Tatiana Argounova-Low, Maria Lucia de Niemeyer Matheus Loureiro, Charlotte Hyltén-Cavallius, and Fredrik Svanberg

MEETING REPORTS

Return of the Native: Contestation, Collaboration, and Co-authorship in Museum Spaces, Australian National University, 18–19 June 2015

Access Is a Human Right: The Federation of International Human Rights Museums Conference, Te Papa, Wellington, 23–25 September 2015

PROJECT REPORTS

Narrative Objects: The Sakha Summer Festival and Cultural Revitalization

Object, Document, and Materiality: Outline of an Ongoing Research Project

Museums Beyond Homogeneity: Museums and Diversity in Sweden

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Csaba Mészáros

Arctic Pastoralist Sakha: Ethnography of Evolution and Microadaptation in Siberia Hiroki Takakura (Melbourne: Trans Pacific Press, 2015), 254 pp. ISBN: 978-1-920901-49-3. Anthropological studies focusing on environment and nature began gaining

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Matthew P. Romaniello

Ferguson. Professor Ferguson has a decade of experience working for the journal, in addition to her research contributions to the field, including her recent monograph, Words Like Birds: Sakha Language Discourses and Practices in the City (2019). I know

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Introduction

Indigenous Methodology

Uliana Vinokurova

Translator : Tatiana Argounova-Low

In this issue of Sibirica scholars from Sakha (Yakutia), Buryatia, Tuva, and Khakassiia present their research with a new paradigm in mind: an indigenous methodology facilitated and represented by indigenous peoples in Siberia. This methodology is

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Jenanne Ferguson

This is my first full issue as the new editor of Sibirica , and I want to provide a brief overview of my previous involvement with the journal. I am a linguistic and sociocultural anthropologist who works primarily in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia

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Mobility and Infrastructure in the Russian Arctic

Das Sein bestimmt das Bewusstsein?

Nikolai Vakhtin

from village to village by less exotic transport, including helicopters and the inevitable AN-2 slogger aircraft. One day we arrived at an abandoned village on the Sakha shore of the Arctic Ocean. We learned that the inhabitants had abandoned it the

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A Visitor's Guide to Shamans and Shamanism

The Kunstkamera's Russian and Asian Ethnographic Collections in the Late Imperial Era

Marisa Karyl Franz

from Central Asia. The gallery began with cabinet one, which displayed Sakha “Clothes, miscellaneous weapons, and handicrafts made of bone.” At the start of this guide to the gallery was “ Russian peasant needlework from Olonets and Tver regions and