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Introduction

Experiencing Anticipation. Anthropological Perspectives

Christopher Stephan and Devin Flaherty

future that anthropologists argue that attention to the future is a definitive preoccupation of our times (e.g. Adams et al. 2009 ). If the future looms larger than ever, there could never be a better time for the anthropological study of anticipation

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Monumental Suspension

Art, Infrastructure, and Eduardo Chillida's Unbuilt Monument to Tolerance

Isaac Marrero-Guillamón

an unbuilt dam in Thailand that looms large in the life of the villages waiting to be displaced. Land speculation, investment deferrals, extreme anxiety, and enhanced solidarity were some of the effects of the uncertainty and anticipation associated

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Introduction

Subjects of Luck—Contingency, Morality, and the Anticipation of Everyday Life

Giovanni da Col and Caroline Humphrey

This introduction illustrates the modalities in which different societies imagine the tension between the impersonal and individual- ized aspects of fortune and fate. After briefly discussing the role of contingency, fortune, and gambling in the formation of subjectivities, we outline how different societies confront the moral conundrums arising from fortune's unequal distribution in the world. We highlight how luck orientations presentify the future by the deployment of what we name 'technologies of anticipation'. Luck and fortune can be seen as conceptual techniques for short-circuiting temporal subjectivities by creating a crack in time-a space of 'compossibility'-where events deemed to be fatal and inevitable become negotiable. We conclude with a reflection on dice, randomness, and acts of gambling in which not merely subjectivities but the fate or fortune of larger social aggrega- tions-including the cosmos-is deemed at stake.

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Andrew Sanchez

This special issue of the Cambridge Journal of Anthropology is entitled ‘Experiencing Anticipation’, guest edited by Devin Flaherty and Christopher Stephan. The collection proceeds from an assumption that although contemporary anthropology is

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Proximity, Responsibility and Temporality at Resource Frontiers

Corporate-Community Relations in the Colombian Mining Sector

Laura Knöpfel

management’ ( Cross 2016: 113 ). The anticipation of the closure governed the corporate responsibility regime, the programmes, practices and discourses, ‘at almost every scale, as if the future is what matters most’ ( Adams et al. 2009: 248 ). Following the

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Committee as Witness

Ethics Review as a Technology of Collective Attestation

Rachel Douglas-Jones

together vision and knowledge in the making of legitimate decisions. Where do research ethics committees come from? Ethics committee work is an internationally growing form of decision making, a technology of anticipation that grants access to

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Giovanni da Col and Caroline Humphrey

As with the preceding companion issue (Social Analysis 56, no. 1), this special issue is concerned with the ways in which fortune, luck, and chance are conceived in a range of different societies and how these concepts are employed to negotiate the contingencies and uncertainties of everyday life. Taken together, the articles gathered in this second collection deal with human attempts to project their desire for mastering uncertainties about the future while solving the moral predicaments of fortune’s proportions and their management in everyday life. Ranging from Melanesian and Greek gamblers to online gamers and Siberian hunters, from lay Chinese mathematicians of fate to young Mongolians, the ethnographies in this special issue reveal the creative potentials of practical matrixes for calculating luck and mobilizing diverse ‘technologies of anticipation’ of the future. A few of the articles present rites to invoke fortune, gambling, or games as practices to master contingency and as generative fields of agentive creativity and subjectivity.

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Mark Donovan and Paolo Onofri

It is difficult to tell a story pretending not to know how it ends. This volume

is concerned with the political and politico-economic events that

took place in Italy during the course of 2007, but in reality it is implicitly

the story of an aborted legislature, the fifteenth in the Republic’s history,

which began in April 2006 and ended prematurely in January 2008.

Perhaps in anticipation of this outcome, the year 2007 was permeated

by a sense of deep political malaise. The government of Romano Prodi,

despite having been in office since only May 2006, and despite its reasonably

effective management of the economy, was weak and unpopular.

Its frailty was rooted, most immediately, in the election outcome,

which gave it a majority of just two in the Senate, and that outcome in

turn resulted in large part from the effects of the electoral system reform

introduced by the center-right government in December 2005. The purpose

of that reform—or counter-reform, as some prefer to call it—was to

minimize the scale of the government’s expected defeat or, reversing the

perspective, to render the center-left’s victory as marginal as possible.

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Ted Nannicelli

Neurons, and Contemporary Action Cinema,” Vassilieva probes Eisenstein's influences, connections, and collaborations with his contemporaries working in the sciences of the mind, noting an anticipation of some important contemporary trends in the field

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In Memoriam

John Urry, 1946–2016

Bob Jessop

as the gaze, performativity, difference, risk, and complexity; anticipations of concepts like the dispositif, embodiment, or haptics; concerns with actor-networks, automobilities, and peak oil; interests in digital photography; or the (dis