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Holding Up Half the Sky

Global Narratives of Girls at Risk and Celebrity Philanthropy

Angharad Valdivia

component of celebrity branding and corporate public relations that seek representation of their actions as cosmopolitan morality and global citizenry. Focusing on the Half the Sky ( HTS ) phenomenon that culminated in a documentary by Maro Chermayeff

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Barbara Franchi and Natália da Silva Perez

The f-word used to be inappropriate for polite company, but today nobody seems afraid to say it, loud and proud. Hollywood stars and world-famous pop singers can openly claim to be feminists; it is now acceptable for mainstream celebrities to emulate that which more radical independent feminist artists have been doing for the past few decades. This gradual mainstreaming of feminism, facilitated in part by easier and wider access to communication technology, is reflected all over mass media. The last couple of years have also seen a number of high-profile female celebrities engaging in feminist political action. When Angelina Jolie and Emma Watson are UN ambassadors in projects that aim to promote the emancipation of women worldwide, when pop singer Beyoncé openly declares that “we have a way to go [to achieve equality] and it’s something that’s pushed aside and something that we have been conditioned to accept,” (Vena, 2013) their voices are heard by a wider audience, one that might not have been reached by the voices of activists and scholars who have for decades denounced the problems caused by gender discrimination.

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Suzan Hirsch

This paper reports on case studies spanning four consecutive years (2005-2008) focused on addressing and challenging Australian primary school boys’ disengagement with English, particularly reading, using an action research process informed by both quantitative and qualitative data. Primary participants were all male and ranged from 8 to 11 years of age. Boys were identified and selected for each case study based on the questionnaire and interview results from whole grade surveys of both males and females. The data results identified the boys with negative views of literacy and boys who identified reading as being a feminine activity, thereby narrowing their perceptions of masculinity. These boys were involved in a reading/mentoring program with high profile professional Rugby League players. The celebrity rugby league players were involved in ten weekly mentoring and reading sessions with male participants each year. These sessions focused on building positive male identity, shifting negative attitudes to reading and challenging negative stereotypes of both professional sportsmen and boys as readers. After each of the case studies, quantitative and qualitative data indicated a positive change in the participants’ attitudes towards reading as well as their perceived stereotypes of males as readers and increased involvement in voluntary reading.

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Miley, What’s Good?

Nicki Minaj’s Anaconda, Instagram Reproductions, and Viral Memetic Violence

Aria S. Halliday

inherent harm of the “glass closet” (284–285)—the hypervisible containment of Black bodies in US society in search of homosexuality that C. Riley Snorton (2014) argues is used to surveil Black queer celebrities—is exacerbated by social media through the

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Melanie Kennedy and Natalie Coulter

. Harris , Anita . 2004 . Future Girl: Young Women in the Twenty-first Century . New York : Routledge . 10.4324/9780203490198 Kennedy , Melanie . 2018 . in press . Tweenhood: Femininity and Celebrity in Tween Popular Culture . London : I

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“Stumbling Upon Feminism”

Teenage Girls’ Forays into Digital and School-Based Feminisms

Crystal Kim and Jessica Ringrose

sources rather dismissively. Chloe, for instance, described sociology coursework enthusiastically, but when she was discussing her admiration for self-proclaimed feminist musician Beyoncé, she spoke with some trepidation and distinguished celebrity

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Maria Bucur

's not even in the same school with me.” She was one of the dorm celebrities since the Freshman Ball. Miss Freshman. Look at them, boy, these celebs know how to suffer too. But a few seconds later I went to her. I took her in my arms and kept her as

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Reading Production and Culture

UK Teen Girl Comics from 1955 to 1960

Joan Ormrod

. Celebrity star culture was developing rapidly in the late 1950s along with the growth of access to media technologies like television, radio, popular music, and film. The early British pop industry used religious discourses to ensure that the emerging stars

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Sarah E. Whitney

encourages spectacle, celebrity, and the gloss of empowerment, reinforces a so-called princess dominance of white middle class femininity ( Forman-Brunell and Hains 2015 ; C. Griffin 2004 ; Harzewski 2011 ; Orenstein 2011 ). When Brianna dusts her blue and

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Contemporary Girls Studies

Reflections on the Inaugural International Girls Studies Association Conference

Victoria Cann, Sarah Godfrey, and Helen Warner

consumer capitalism. Applying her construction of what she calls Anaconda Feminism to the reading of Minaj’s star image, Halliday considers the complicated ways in which black women celebrities negotiate public life. Perhaps the most pressing contribution