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“Like Alice, I was Brave”

The Girl in the Text in Olemaun’s Residential School Narratives

Roxanne Harde

(and, therefore, an agent of decolonization), and it seems no accident that they were published during the years that Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) convened. The picturebooks were published after the chapter books; the first of them

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Girls with Disabilities in the Global South

Rethinking the Politics of Engagement

Xuan Thuy Nguyen

can transform all forms of exclusion, we need to address the challenges of visual approaches critically to understand the extent to which methods such as drawing and photovoice can address inclusion and exclusion. Decolonizing Methodologies

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Claudia Mitchell

The concerns addressed by the authors in this issue point to the need for a reimagining of girlhood as it is currently framed by settler and carceral states. To quote the guest editors, Sandrina de Finney, Patricia Krueger-Henney, and Lena Palacios, “The very notions of girl and girlhood are embedded in a colonial privileging of white, cis-heteropatriarchal, ableist constructs of femininity bolstered by Euro-Western theories of normative child development that were—and still are—violently imposed on othered, non-white girls, queer, and gender-nonconforming bodies.” Indigenous-led initiatives in Canada, such as the Networks for Change: Girl-led ‘from the Ground up’ Policy-making to Address Sexual Violence in Canada and South Africa project, highlighted in four of the eight articles in this issue, along with the insights and recommendations offered in the articles that deal with the various positionalities and contexts of Latinx and Black girls, can be described as creating a new trail. In using the term trail, here, I am guided by the voices of the Indigenous researchers, activists, elders, and community scholars who participated in the conference called More Than Words in Addressing Sexual and Gender-based Violence: A Dialogue on the Impact of Indigenous-focused, Youthled Engagement Through the Arts on Families and Communities held in Montreal. Their use of the term trail suggests a new order, one that is balanced between the ancestors and spiritual teachings on the one hand, and contemporary spaces that need to be decolonized on the other with this initiative being guided by intergenerationality and a constant interrogation of language. The guest editors of this special issue and all the contributors have gone a long way on this newly named trail.

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Claudia Mitchell

This issue of Girlhood Studies begins with a Special Section on Indigenous Girls as a critical area of scholarship and activism in girlhood studies. 1 Recognizing the need for decolonizing perspectives and approaches, the guest editors, Kirstsen

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Dustin William Louie

sexual exploitation prevention education for Indigenous girls is understood as a community-based one, grassroots approaches are the preferred mechanism. Indigenous frameworks must take precedence to support a decolonizing agenda; technologies of

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Natalie Clark

facilitator, and finally my own journey of identity as an Indigenous woman and mother. This is a give-away paper. I offer it as a prayer, as a give-away poem. There is no Ceremony for Completing an Academic Paper. Post-colonial, anti-colonial, decolonizing

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“This Is My Story”

The Reclaiming of Girls’ Education Discourses in Malala Yousafzai’s Autobiography

Rosie Walters

York University Press . 10.18574/nyu/9780814770214.001.0001 Quinby , Lee . 1992 . “ The Subject of Memoirs: The Woman Warrior’s Technology of Ideographic Selfhood .” In De/Colonizing the Subject: The Politics of Gender in Women’s Autobiography

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April Mandrona

of exploration including the ethics of recognition, truth-telling, and decolonization, as well as indigenization. The introduction by Lindquist et al. to the Special Section on Indigenous Girls, “Speaking Our Truths, Building Our Strengths: Shaping

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Nirmala Erevelles and Xuan Thuy Nguyen

South, Thuy Nguyen uses participatory visual research as a way of describing the agency and perspective of disabled girls living in Vietnam. Nguyen uses a decolonizing framework that problematizes the universal framing of disability in Western

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Overlapping Time and Place

Early Modern England’s Girlhood Discourse and Indigenous Girlhood in the Dominion of Canada (1684-1860)

Haidee Smith Lefebvre

Journal of Women Studies 23 , no. 3 : 1 – 11 . doi: 10.1353/fro.2003.0010 10.1353/fro.2003.0010 Walia , Harsha . 2014 . “ Decolonizing Together: Moving Beyond a Politics of Solidarity Toward a Practice of Decolonization .” Pp. 44 – 51 in The