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Noncitizens’ Rights

Moving beyond Migrants’ Rights

Sin Yee Koh

, skilled migrants, expatriates, and ethnic minority diasporic communities in Malaysia and Brunei. Writing this essay has given me an opportunity to reflect on the common theme underlying these research and teaching endeavors—that of differential rights

Open access

Expat, Local, and Refugee

“Studying Up” the Global Division of Labor and Mobility in the Humanitarian Industry in Jordan

Reem Farah

Jordan's socioeconomic issues, such as “driving up housing costs, forcing down wages, and increasing unemployment among Jordanians” ( Zyck and Armstrong 2014: 6 ). At the same time, an unprecedented influx of expatriate humanitarians arrived to address

Open access

Federica Tarabusi

institutions, as well as the comings and goings of foreign “expatriates” 3 ( stranci in Bosnian), have permeated the cultural intimacy ( Herzfeld 1997 ) of the country and its inhabitants. Such collective perceptions on the part of Bosnian citizens of their

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Ruin of Empire

The Uganda Railway and Memory Work in Kenya

Norman Aselmeyer

, their attempts to direct Kenyan memory converged and reinforced each other. In what follows, I will briefly portray the “memory work” of each group. White Expatriates The first group who promoted a specific memory of the Uganda Railway were British

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Autobiography, Journalism, and Controversy

Freya Stark's Baghdad Sketches

Mary Henes

This article examines Freya Stark's life-writing over a forty-year period in order to shed light on her experience of Baghdad from 1929 to 1933. The article focuses on Stark's resistance to expected feminine norms of the British community, and contextualizes her experience alongside that of Gertrude Bell and Stefana Drower. Stark's experiences, and those of Drower, reveal the ways in which British women resisted the mundane expatriate lifestyle, and gained a great deal of cultural understanding though their interaction with Iraqis. Furthermore, the article discusses Stark's work at the Baghdad Times, a literary apprenticeship that also led to the publication of Baghdad Sketches. The article not only highlights the plurality of autobiographical presentation characteristic of Stark's oeuvre, but also reveals how Stark refashioned her experiences throughout her life, taking into account her changing status and the different political and cultural climates in which the works were published.

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Neutrality in foreign aid

Shifting contexts, shifting meanings—examples from South Sudan

Elżbieta Drążkiewicz

missions that are often singlehandedly governed by expatriates sent by a small North American or European nongovernmental organization (NGO)? These organizations are often neglected in studies of humanitarianism. For this reason, I want to draw attention to

Open access

David Lempert

the contemporary ‘expatriate community’ that has its roots in former colonial communities of military, colonial administration functionaries, missionaries and business representatives. The identity of the elite expatriate subculture is an imagined

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Making the best of an inappropriate textbook

Using an ‘international edition’ to teach critical thinking and intercultural understanding

Kristina C. Marcellus

students are Muslim, and are predominantly U.A.E. nationals. The few expatriate students come mostly from families – originally from elsewhere in the region – who are long-term residents of this country, sometimes for several generations. Almost none of

Open access

Rafael Guendelman Hales

community, creates a network of communication among its members, and acts as an important meeting center for different activities related to culture, politics, and expatriate Iraqi society in general. There are two main groups that meet regularly: the Older

Open access

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Mette Louise Berg, and Johanna Waters

position of “expatriate” versus “local” humanitarian workers in Jordan. Further expanding the focus on local responses to displacement, Heather Wurtz and Olivia Wilkinson examine the ways that local faith actors in Mexico and Honduras conceptualize and