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Laurence Piper

That democracy has won is common cause. The vast majority of states of the world today are termed ‘democratic’, a fact that stands in some contrast to the global order just some fifty years ago. Even more importantly, there is no competing alternative model of political rule, other than perhaps forms of radical Islam. Yet at the very moment of its triumph, democracy finds itself in trouble. Recent survey evidence from the United States suggests both political disengagement and a growing cynicism towards parties and elites, and similar trends are evident in Europe. Moreover, democracy faces substantial problems in the developing world, whether a tangible fragility among newly democratic states in Africa, or serious discontent at the responsiveness of government in many middle-income countries. Hence, at the very moment of hegemony we have increasing talk of democratic deficit.

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Policing the French Empire

Colonial Law Enforcement and the Search for Racial-Territorial Hegemony

Samuel Kalman

variety of models in use within the diverse array of locales. However, only rarely have collections focused exclusively on the French empire, and then principally sub-Saharan territories along with Madagascar. 5 Yet the entire “très grande France

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Editorial

Some Senses of Pan-Africanism from the South

Christopher Allsobrook

’, which encourage rational autonomy, self-directed, endogenous development models and tolerance for ethno-cultural diversity. Valery Ferim shares Ugwuanyi’s worry that Pan-African solidarity since the turn of the 20 th century has failed to prevent the

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Empire and Economics

Decolonising Colonialism and Its Legacies in Africa

Edited by Lawrence Hamilton

concerned with reviewing the history of developmental states on the African continent which have been neglected in the theoretical literature. It is important to consider not only successful models of developmental states but also partially successful and

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Romanticizing Difference

Identities in Transformation after World War I

Nadia Malinovich

“the Jewish soul,” “the French genius,” or “the English spirit,” for example, were prevalent in both popular discourse and also literary and scientific scholarship as explanatory models of individual human personalities during this period. Importantly