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Weapons for Witnessing

American Street Preaching and the Rhythms of War

Kyle Byron

responding to this imperative, street preachers transform streets, sidewalks, and other forms of urban infrastructure into sites of religious performance. 2 Referencing Filip De Boeck (2012) , Penny Harvey and Hannah Knox (2015: 5) describe

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Introduction

Performance, Power, Exclusion, and Expansion in Anthropological Accounts of Protests

Aet Annist

( Youngs 2017 ), we are offering this topical special section to analyze protests through an ethnographic lens. Concentrating on power and performance, the articles consider the matrix within which the protests emerge—the time and space, the historic and

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Alexander Riley

Jeffrey Alexander, Bernhard Giesen and Jason Mast (eds.), Social Performance: Symbolic Action, Cultural Pragmatics and Ritual, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006, 374 pp.

Ron Eyerman and Lisa McCormick (eds.), Myth, Meaning, and Performance: Toward a New Cultural Sociology of the Arts, Boulder: Paradigm Publishers, 2006, 166 pp.

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Less Than One But More Than Many

Anthropocene as Science Fiction and Scholarship-in-the-Making

Heather Anne Swanson, Nils Bubandt, and Anna Tsing

How might one responsibly review a field just coming into being—such as that provoked by the term Anthropocene? In this article, we argue for two strategies. First, working from the premise that the Anthropocene field is best understood within its emergence, we review conferences rather than publications. In conference performances, we glimpse the themes and tensions of a field-to-come. Second, we interpret Anthropocene as a science-fiction concept, that is, one that pulls us out of familiar space and time to view our predicaments differently. This allows us to explore emergent figurations, genres, and practices for the transdisciplinary study of real and imagined worlds framed by human disturbance. In the interplay and variation across modes for constructing this field, Anthropocene scholarship finds its shape.

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Recovering Durkheim's 'Second Program of Research'

Roy Rappaport and Jeffrey C. Alexander

Massimo Rosati

Durkheim's 'second program of research' above all refers to his project as developed in Les formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse. This essay examines how it has in turn been developed and taken up nowadays in the work of Roy Rappaport and Jeffrey Alexander. Both of them are concerned with the centrality of ritual and the sacred as active, constitutive elements not just of religion but of all social life, not least modern social life. However, a key difference between them can be found in the issue of the internal dimension of ritual and of the individual's participation in public performance of this. Rappaport emphasizes some sort of general notion of acceptance, in an effort to open up things and get away from the particular epistemological as well as theological commitments of the idea of belief. Alexander still appears to work with the modernist epistemology and 'Protestant' theology of belief. His project of a new Durkheimian cultural sociology has nonetheless itself opened up all kinds of things, and is one of the most creative and dynamic research programs in sociology nowadays.

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Rebecca M. Schreiber

performance. Their installation, Embassy of the Refugee , which was displayed as part of Bay Area Now 8 held at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) in San Francisco, included a 20’ x 10’ x 18’ structure resembling that of a partially built church or house

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Introduction

Doing Ritual While Thinking about It?

Emma Gobin

reflexivity’ and the role they play in the formal economy of ritual performance have remained largely unexamined. In drawing on various empirical case studies to address these issues, this collection of articles proceeds from the idea that the reflexive

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Introduction

Creative Practices/Resistant Acts

Nesreen Hussein and Iain MacKenzie

participatory performance, and roundtable discussions. One of the common threads that brought the contributions together, and that initiated the conceptualization of the event, was a shared understanding of revolutions as inherently “creative acts.” Those acts

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Giovanni A. Travaglino and Benjamin Abrams

’s analysis of flying protests in Damascus, and Caroline Rooney’s reading of a performance project, Laila Soliman’s No Time for Art in Egypt. On the one hand, Adwan draws on theoretical repertoires in the field of theatre studies to analyze protests that

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Benjamin Abrams and Giovanni A. Travaglino

in instances of collective action and political behavior. Matthew Hayes opens this issue with his article “Never Mind the Ballots: The Edible Ballot Society and the Performance of Citizenship.” In the article, Hayes examines an unusual instance of