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Sarah E. Whitney

(predominately white) tween hero, Winston emphasizes the continuous progression of her protagonist’s skills over the transition from elementary to junior high school, and adds supportive adult female mentors. By offering a politics of continuity rather than

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Jasmyn Galley

analogous to the cultural, political, and social oppression of Aboriginal Peoples throughout history at the hands of colonialists as well as at those of contemporary Canadians. I will discuss how Highway’s play also implies hopeful potential for change in

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Claudia Mitchell

Gesa Kirsch, in her book, Ethical Dilemmas in Feminist Research: The Politics of Location, Interpretation and Publication ( 1999 ) posed these same questions in relation to feminist research with women. Kirsch raises concerns, applicable, I think, to

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Personal, Powerful, Political

Activist Networks by, for, and with Girls and Young Women

Catherine Vanner and Anuradha Dugal

constraining them. It recognizes that girl activists often operate within girl-led and/or intergenerational activism networks that are characterized by complicated power dynamics ( Brown 2016 ). While there is increasing recognition of girls as political

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Making It Up

Intergenerational Activism and the Ethics of Empowering Girls

Emily Bent

: Girls’ Spectacular (Dis)empowerment Intergenerational partnership means bringing girls into our political lives, intentionally disrupting generational power dynamics between adults and girls, and sharing our stories and experiences as feminist

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“I’m No Donna Reed”

Postfeminist Rhetoric in Christian At-Home Daughterhood Texts

Elizabeth Shively

feminist concerns about the practice while, at the same time, dismissing feminist politics. In order to make this movement legible to contemporary women, advocates employ postfeminist strategies to suggest that they do, in fact, value women, while at the

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Kaoru Miyazawa

important to introduce them to Weeks’s (1998) notion of sexual citizenship. This is because sexual citizenship embraces both the public and the political nature of sexuality, and it assists girls to make conscious decisions related to sexuality in the

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Introduction

On a 1st Anniversary

Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

Joseph Biden. I [Frank] am reminded of a similar note I wrote in an article for the Sexual Violence Research Initiative's “16 Days of Activism” series in early December: “We write this post amidst political protests that have shaken Kyrgyzstan, with the

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Claudia Mitchell

There is something rebellious about the work of Girlhood Studies so it is perhaps fitting that “Visual Disruptions” is the theme of this seventeenth issue of Girlhood Studies. The significance of 17 as an age in the life of girls and young women may vary, of course, across cultures, and, indeed, within contemporary popular culture in the West it is not necessarily seen as disruptive, as research on Seventeen magazine highlights. Nonetheless, we can think of the Janis Ian song from the 1970s, “At Seventeen,” and the many songs from The Beatles to the Sex Pistols that refer to girls being 17, and contemplate a state that is far from compliant in relation to conventional femininity. The articles in this themed issue of Girlhood Studies, guest-edited by Danai S. Mupotsa and Elina Oinas, offer a fascinating investigation into the politics of girlhood and visual culture, and the politics of disruption itself. The contributions are also a testament to the close alliance between feminism and visual studies.

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Rethinking Agency and Resistance

What Comes After Girl Power?

Marnina Gonick, Emma Renold, Jessica Ringrose, and Lisa Weems

With the current proliferation of images and narratives of girls and girlhood in popular culture, many ‘truths’ about girls circulate with certainty. Amongst the aims of this Special Issue is to examine critically these ‘confi dent characterizations’ (Trinh 1989), to trace the social conditions which produce these ‘truths’ along with the public fascination with girls and to analyze critically the eff ects of these ‘truths’ in the lives of young girls. Th e concepts of resistance and agency have been critical to the field of youth studies, sociology of education and school ethnographies (Hall and Jeff erson 1976; McRobbie 1978; Willis 1978) for conceptualizing the relationships between young people and their social worlds. Ground breaking scholarship by McRobbie (2000) challenges the gendered assumptions of political agency articulated in previous theories of subcultures developed in the 1970s and 80s. While feminist poststructuralist work in the 1990s has re-conceptualized agency in ways that are markedly diff erent to humanist notions of rational actors with free-will (Butler 2006; Davies 2000), feminist researchers have also shown the importance of a classed, raced and sexed analysis of agency. For example, scholarship by feminists of color have shown how girls of color challenge and defy dominant stereotypes of girlhood in culturally specifi c ways such as participating in spokenword contests, rap and hip hop, and ‘beauty contests’ (Hernandez and Rehman 2002; Gaunt 2006). In the changing social, economic, political and globalizing context of the new millennium, where ‘girl power’ has become a marketing tool and a branding (Klein 2000) of girlhood, it is important to look anew at the relations between girlhood, power, agency and resistance.