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Who (the) Girls and Boys Are

Gender Nonconformity in Middle-Grade Fiction

Michele Byers

, as they mirror for us their potential futures in the present. These characters exist in queer temporalities in which their futures are imagined “according to logics that lie outside [of] those paradigmatic markers of life experience” ( Halberstam 2005

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Queering Virginity

From Unruly Girls to Effeminate Boys

Eftihia Mihelakis

collection of eight essays that seeks to offer a non-linear and queer approach to understanding virginity in literature and popular culture. This volume openly challenges the perceived monopoly of the hymen as the sole signifier of virginity, proposing

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Nicholas L. Syrett

From the field's very inception, scholars of the queer past have noted, though sometimes in passing, the centrality of age asymmetry in structuring how same-sex sex has been understood and practiced. In the foundational work of classicist David

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Introduction

Toward a Queer Sinofuturism

Ari Heinrich, Howard Chiang, and Ta-wei Chi

of it. We've become the sign of it, the backdrop to it, and the style manual for it. — Aimee Bahng (2018) This special issue on “Queer Sinofuturisms” aims to explore how artists and writers working across various media in Sinophone contexts use

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Freak Temporality

Female Adolescence in the Novels of Carson McCullers

Alison Sperling

throughout, the non-normative bodies that populate McCullers’s fiction—the queers, the freaks, the “deaf-mutes,” the “dwarf” and the “giant” (463), the drunk, the sick, the half-blind, and, I will add, the awkward female adolescent—are not mere symbol(s) of

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Theorizing “The Plunge”

(Queer) Girls’ Adolescence, Risk, and Subjectivity in Blue is the Warmest Color

Michelle Miller

the text negotiating her anxiety—both positive and negative—regarding the queer future she comes to want despite her awareness of the social and familial consequences this future would hold. The story is told primarily through Clem’s diary entries

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Laurel Hart, Pamela Lamb, and Joshua Cader

others. While I faced marginalization and discrimination as a young queer woman, I was also privileged as a white, middle-class college student. Discourse communities, such as those created by queer girls and young women on social media, are leading

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Han Tao and Sevasti-Melissa Nolas

Queer/Tongzhi China: New Perspectives on Research, Activism and Media Cultures

Elisabeth L. Engebretsen and William F. Schroeder (eds.) with Hongwei Bao, Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2015, ISBN 978-877-694-155-0, 274 pp., Hb: £60, Pb: £20.

Queer Comrades: Gay Identity and Tongzhi Activism in Postsocialist China

Hongwei Bao, Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2018, ISBN 978-87-7694-236-6, 265 pp., Hb: £65, Pb: £22.50.

White Gold: Stories of Breast Milk Sharing

Susan Falls, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2017, ISBN 978-1-4962-0189-8. 242 pp., Hb: $65, Pb: $25.

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Introduction

Dickens and Sex

Holly Furneaux and Anne Schwan

This collection explores the still underrepresented topics of sex, erotics and desire in the work of Charles Dickens. Contributors draw upon and suggest new points of convergence between a wide range of theoretical perspectives including cultural phenomenology, materialism, new historicism, critical race studies, feminist and queer theory. Analysis of a broad range of Dickens’s fiction, journalism and correspondence demonstrates Dickens’s sustained commitment to exploring a diverse range of sexual matters throughout his career.

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Editorial

Dislodging Girlhood?

Claudia Mitchell

I am very grateful to Barbara Brickman, the guest editor of this Special Issue of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal for her term “dislodging girlhood” in the context of heteronormativity. Repeatedly in this issue Marnina Gonick’s pivotal question, “Are queer girls, girls?” (2006: 122) is cited. In the 13 years since she posed this question, we have not seen enough attempts made to address it. To mix my metaphors I see this issue of Girlhood Studies as helping to break the silence and simultaneously to open the floodgates to a ground-breaking collection of responses to Gonick’s question. Given the rise of the right in the US and in so many other countries, queer girls— trans, lesbian, gender non-conforming, non-binary to mention just a few possibilities—are at even greater risk than before. Girlhood Studies has always been concerned with social justice, so this special issue is a particularly important one in our history. It is also worth noting that many of the articles are written or co-authored by new scholars, signaling an encouraging trend in academic work that has social justice at its core. I thank Barbara Brickman, the authors, and the reviewers for their history-making contributions to the radical act of dislodging girlhood.