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Coming Together in the So-Called Refugee Crisis

A Collaboration Among Refugee Newcomers, Migrants, Activists and Anthropologists in Berlin

Nasima Selim, Mustafa Abdalla, Lilas Alloulou, Mohamed Alaedden Halli, Seth M. Holmes, Maria Ibiß, Gabi Jaschke, and Johanna Gonçalves Martín

In 2015, Germany entered what would later become known as the ‘refugee crisis’. The Willkommenskultur (welcoming culture) trope gained political prominence and met with significant challenges. In this article, we focus on a series of encounters in Berlin, bringing together refugee newcomers, migrants, activists and anthropologists. As we thought and wrote together about shared experiences, we discovered the limitations of the normative assumptions of refugee work. One aim of this article is to destabilise terms such as refugee, refugee work, success and failure with our engagements in the aftermath of the ‘crisis’. Refugee work is not exclusively humanitarian aid directed towards the alleviation of suffering but includes being and doing together. Through productive failures and emergent lessons, the collaboration enhanced our understandings of social categories and the role of anthropology.

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“It's a Big Umbrella”

Uncertainty, Pentecostalism, and the Integration of Zimbabwe Exemption Permit Immigrants in Johannesburg, South Africa

Tinashe Chimbidzikai

networks to obtain a patron who enabled them to work in Dar es Salaam's informal sector. These young refugees worked as tailors or fishermen; some sold coffee, and others helped other refugee entrepreneurs carry out their trading businesses. The young

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Expat, Local, and Refugee

“Studying Up” the Global Division of Labor and Mobility in the Humanitarian Industry in Jordan

Reem Farah

, and Tara Brian . 2013 . “ North-South Migration: A Different Look at the Migration and Development Debate .” Migration Policy Practice 3 ( 3 ): 14 – 20 . Lenner , Katharina , and Lewis Turner . 2018 . “ Making Refugees Work? The

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Min Al-Mukhayyam’ (‘From the Camp’)

Discourses of Difference and the Boundaries of Exile amongst Palestinian Refugees in Jordan

Michael Pérez

aspirations and participation. In a comparative study of refugee work attitudes conducted in 1999 and again in 2011, camp refugee men expressed slightly greater desires for work than those living outside the city ( Tiltnes and Zhang 2013 ). In addition, these