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Sensory Perception of Rock Art in East Siberia and the Far East

Soviet Archeological “Discoveries” and Indigenous Evenkis

Donatas Brandišauskas

nonexistent rituals published by early ethnographers. At the same time, their findings, processes of documentation, and personal perceptions were also shaped by their sensual experiences. Various hardships related to site exploration and the respect shown to

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Pierre Déléage

Translator : Translated by Matthew Carey

October 1964. Tïlïwe village on the Upper Maroni river, French Guyana. Palanaiwa, a Wayana chief, decides to organize a major initiation ritual known as a maraké . Opoja, chief of a neighboring village called Tïpïti, accepts the invitation. The

Open access

Editorial

Food and Cooking in the Middle East and North Africa

Éléonore Armanet and Christian Bromberger

Abstract: The article introduces the issue, in which the following topics are addressed: history of the anthropology of food; food choices and prohibitions; food, cooking and identity; cooking and rituals; cooking, sexual roles and social relations; and cooking, migrations and globalisation.

Résumé : L’article présente le numéro où sont abordés les thèmes suivants : histoire de l’anthropologie de l’alimentation ; choix et interdits alimentaires ; alimentation, cuisine et identité ; cuisine et rituels ; cuisine, rôles sexuels et relations sociales ; cuisine, migrations et globalisation.

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Introduction

Doing Ritual While Thinking about It?

Emma Gobin

Focusing on the reflexive attitudes that religious specialists adopt toward their ceremonial practices, this themed section proposes to renew a line of inquiry developed around the complex and protean link that exists between ritual and reflexivity

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Introduction

Popular Religious Practices and Perceptions in the Middle East and Central Asia

Mary Elaine Hegland

People at the popular level often hold religious perceptions and engage in religious practices that make sense to them within their own existential situations, even if they fall outside orthodoxy. Although political leaders and religious authorities may attempt to mould people’s religious perceptions and practices according to their own ideas and interpretations of religion, people frequently find ways to evade or ignore such pressures, to rationalise their deviations or to continue to live and think according to their own self-generated religious frameworks. The authors of the articles in this special issue provide examples of how people’s actual practices and religious beliefs arise out of their own personal situations and histories though at odds with the pronouncements of religious specialists.

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Introduction

Repatriation and Ritual, Repatriation as Ritual

Laura Peers, Lotten Gustafsson Reinius, and Jennifer Shannon

survival. The editors and authors of this special section of Museum Worlds have taken a different set of perspectives. We explore repatriation as ritual: a set of highlighted performances enacting cosmological beliefs for a special purpose, deeply

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Don Handelman and Galina Lindquist

We have discussed ritual between us for a long time—Don often from his suspicions of the canonical understanding of ritual as representation, Galina through her studies of healing and therapeutic efficacy

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Narratives of the Invisible

Autobiography, Kinship, and Alterity in Native Amazonia

Vanessa Elisa Grotti and Marc Brightman

societies outside Amazonia ( Chaumeil 1983 ; Eliade 1964 ; Harner 1973) . In native Amazonia, a genre of ritual autobiography exists that combines mythic narratives and stories of personal experience in performances of dreams and visions, and the analysis

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Introduction

Why Ritual in Its Own Right? How So?

Don Handelman

Calvin, who introduces this collection of essays on ritual in its own right, understands ritual as well as many anthropologists. Calvin is dramatizing thematics that I am trying to avoid. Complaining about the peanut butter, spoiled because his mother did not observe the proper ritual for scooping it out, he is telling us: do the ritual correctly. It exists because it has a function—control. Perform control in your ritual, and you will have control in your life. The ritual of how to scoop out peanut butter is a representation of life. Living produces its own symbols, its own reflections, and these are the ritual, existing to enact themes of living—here that of control. The ritual has meaning, otherwise why the argument between Calvin and his mother over its importance for living? For Calvin, scooping out peanut butter is akin to a Geertzian model of and model for living—you scoop peanut butter the way you live your life. One thing is certain: to understand the peanut butter ritual, one begins with life, not with a jar of peanut butter. First, though, let’s have a look at the peanut butter in the jar …

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Introduction

Shamans and Sacred Landscapes in Buriatiia

Katherine Metzo

The three articles in this issue of Sibirica focus on the ways in which sacred landscapes have been (re)integrated into the ritual life of indigenous Buriats, as well as how they can become contested terrains. Once considered the opiate of the masses by Soviet leaders, religion is no longer “dangerous” in Russia. Decades of institutionalized atheism have taken their toll, however, as sacred sites have been secularized, shamans have lost links to their ongons, and Buriats have forgotten their clan affiliations. In the past decade and a half, shamanism has reemerged and practitioners are striving to revive and re-invent the practice to return shamanism to a central position in the everyday lives of rural and urban communities.