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Introduction

Reading and Writing in Prison

Anne Schwan

The aims of this special issue on ‘Reading and Writing in Prison’ are twofold: to insist on the cultural significance of paying serious critical attention to the genre of prison writing beyond canonical authors (such as Oscar Wilde) and to showcase reading and writing in prison as a space for radical pedagogy and social transformation – potential transformation not only for those ‘inside’ but also those going into prisons as facilitators, be they creative practitioners, academics, or university students.

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Editorial

South to a New Place

Suzanne W. Jones and Sharon Monteith

In 1971 Albert Murray published South To A Very Old Place. Commissioned by the editor of Harper’s magazine, Willie Morris, to write about ‘home’ in a series of articles, the African American writer produced much more: South To A Very Old Place is memoir, travelogue, social commentary. Orchestrated as a jazz and blues composition, it is a meditation on the American South. Taking his title as our starting point, in this issue of Critical Survey we have gathered contributors who continue the work of critically and creatively mapping the American South, a region that exasperates as it inspires definition(s). Murray’s blues forms are open-ended and improvised so the blues metaphor and the jazz form are key in a collection called ‘South To A New Place’. It begins to chart connections with ‘other’ Souths in ways that open up spaces and places from which we might read the South as a site of exchange – the South of Italy in Michael Kreyling’s essay; the South as shaped and commodified by the best-selling magazine Southern Living in Amy Elias’s essay; and the literary South of Walker Percy and Richard Ford’s making in Martyn Bone’s essay, for example.

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Editorial

Subjects and Citizens

Lincoln Geraghty

In the last few months Britain has lived through several moments when the idea of being a citizen has been at the forefront of people’s minds. In the space of twenty-four hours in July 2005 we experienced the jubilation of winning the right to host the 2012 London Olympics and felt the horror and shock caused by the terrorist attacks on the London transport network. Both events showed in stark contrast what being a citizen means for a nation in the twenty-first century: the inevitable coming together of a people to celebrate national success turned to bewilderment as Britons struggled to understand how fellow citizens could inflict such destruction on their own country. Questioning citizenship is now a daily occurrence in the national press as tabloids call for loyalty tests, immigrants to be repatriated, and tougher laws for extremists. The following six articles, written before the aforementioned events, tackle some of the very same issues that now trouble us. They address themes such as identity, nationality, confinement, attacks on liberty, citizenship, and being the subject of oppression. Analysing at a fundamental level the nature of being a subject or citizen, these papers challenge notions of dominant ideology and highlight the importance of self in the construction of identity and a harmonious citizenry.

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Edited by Bryan Loughrey and Graham Holderness

that spirit, we want to open more space for new entrants to the academic profession to publish in the journal, as well as continuing to disseminate work from those creatively engaged in traditional scholarship. So, as a thirtieth birthday present to the

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A Journey to Australia

Travel, Media, and the Politics of Representation

Helen Bones

produced a unique reimagining of Australia in geopolitical terms as Raum ohne Volk (space without people). Ross used cinematic techniques to draw out themes explored in his book The Unfinished Continent (1930), which suggests that Australia

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In Memoriam

John Urry, 1946–2016

Bob Jessop

new subjects and ways of thinking—whether it was power, social theory, space, time, localism and regionalism, disorganized capitalism, leisure and tourism, nature and the environment, mobilities, the complexities of global society, energy usage and

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C.W.R.D. Moseley

storytelling/narratorial levels, or different implied audiences, even within the same tale. 3 Just so the Man of Law can be sniffy about the poems by his own author he has ‘read’ – but that author is also a fictional character in the same narrative space

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Katrin Röder and Christoph Singer

, 317, 319. 28 Karl Hardy, ‘Unsettling Hope: Contemporary Indigenous Politics, Settler Colonialism, and Utopianism’, Spaces of Utopia: An Electronic Journal , 2nd series, no. 1 (2012), 123–136, here 125, < https

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Pippa Marland and Anna Stenning

other forms of movement, can serve as narrative devices, as aids to characterisation, and as metaphors for mental energy or its absence. Lovatt explains that this is partly due to the limited time and space of Edwards’ storyworlds, where the situation of

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Introduction

What Is Old Is New Again

Jeff Horn

Through a variety of disciplinary lenses, this innovative forum, coedited with Victoria Thompson, investigates a particular cultural space and time, namely the emergence of proto–roller coasters known as montagnes russes or “Russian mountains” in Paris in 1817. Peggy Davis, Sun-Young Park, and Christine Haynes depict the early years of the Restoration (1814/1815–1830) as a liminal moment in the emergence of modernity. Although this forum began as a panel at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies, the authors have extended and improved their pieces significantly. Taken together, they show that as foreigners flocked to Paris and the French adjusted to diminished circumstances in the aftermath of Napoleon’s second defeat, identities were in flux. This forum explores how and why the montagnes russes became such a cultural phenomenon and suggests their role in forging a new French identity in the wake of war and revolution.