Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • NATIONAL IDENTITY x
  • History of Ideology x
Clear All
Free access

Jean Elisabeth Pedersen

“What is a nation?” Ernest Renan’s famous rhetorical question to an audience at the Sorbonne on 11 March 1882 has remained vital for a wide variety of scholars in fields as diverse as history, literary criticism, sociology, philosophy, and political science. Renan initially posed the question barely ten years after the close of the Franco-Prussian War, which had sparked the establishment of the French Third Republic, the unification of Germany under the leadership of Wilhelm I, and the transfer of the disputed territory of Alsace-Lorraine from French to German control in the months between July 1870 and May 1871. Renan made no overt mention of these events while he was speaking, but he rejected any possible answer to his question that might attempt to base the creation of nations and national identities on shared “race, language, [economic] interests, religious affinity, geography, [or] military necessities.” This explicit refusal constituted an implicit rejection of the entire range of German justifications for the acquisition of the two recently French border provinces.

Free access

Romanticizing Difference

Identities in Transformation after World War I

Nadia Malinovich

critical role that essentialist ideas about the relationship between language and national identity played in determining new political boundaries in Europe after World War I. The notion that a language represents the “soul” or volksgeist of a nation

Free access

Rethinking World War I

Occupation, Liberation, and Reconstruction

George Robb and W. Brian Newsome

administration of Belgium. 8 German occupation of western Russia has also evolved into a subject of sustained scholarship, figuring not only in Vejas Liulevicius’s War Land on the Eastern Front: Culture, National Identity, and German Occupation in World War I

Open access

Heidi Hakkarainen

- und Staats-Bibliothek,” Gelehrte Anzeigen , 29 June 1849. 75 Pieter M. Judson, Exclusive Revolutionaries: Liberal Politics, Social Experience and National Identity in the Austrian Empire, 1848–1914 (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996), 29

Free access

Introduction

A Focus on the History of Concepts

Eirini Goudarouli

but also to understand the complex role of power and hierarchy in both national and international contexts. Nygård and Strang underline the importance of recognizing the implications of the peripheral self-understanding of a few Nordic intellectuals in

Full access

Gender, Leadership and Representative Democracy

The Differential Impacts of the Global Pandemic

Kim Rubenstein, Trish Bergin, and Pia Rowe

Introduction The need for effective leadership is heightened during times of national crisis. What is more, the impact and effect of that leadership is not only in the capacity to make wise decisions, but also in the consequences for the

Full access

Marcos S. Scauso, Garrett FitzGerald, Arlene B. Tickner, Navnita Chadha Behera, Chengxin Pan, Chih-yu Shih, and Kosuke Shimizu

idea of a God-given, reasoning human nature ( Jahn 2013: 43–53 ). Despite its seemingly broad respect for all those “human” beings whose exercise of reason grants them theoretical equality, this particular form of Western, liberal identity upholds

Free access

Policing the French Empire

Colonial Law Enforcement and the Search for Racial-Territorial Hegemony

Samuel Kalman

Aissaoui, Immigration and National Identity: North African Political Movements in Colonial and Postcolonial France (London: Tauris Academic Studies, 2009); Jim House and Neil MacMaster, Paris 1961: Algerians, State Terror and Memory (Oxford: Oxford

Free access

Introduction

Cultural Heritages and Their Transmission

Elizabeth C. Macknight

of the issue was the European Year of Cultural Heritage (EYCH) in 2018. There were four main themes for the EYCH: protection, engagement, sustainability, and innovation. National coordinators and local organizers of events and initiatives across the

Free access

Boris Maslov

(Britannia, Columbia, Germania, Marianne) points to the ease with which they can be appropriated by the national state as foci of collective identity. 25 The prominence of abstract concepts in poetic texts that aspire to political relevance in this period