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Editorial

John Gillespie and Sarah Richmond

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

This issue spans the entirety of Sartre's philosophical life, from his mémoire on images written at the age of twenty-two for his diploma at the Ecole normale supérieure to his thoughts about democracy as expressed in his final interview, Hope Now, at seventy-four. Fittingly enough, in between come reflections on sin and love and on the ageing body. As a result, we can get a sense of how Sartre's thinking changes and develops throughout his career and is always engaged, right to the end.

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

If Descartes’ soul was always thinking, Sartre's soul (if we may put it this way) was always not just thinking but putting those thoughts on paper. It is an indication of the enormous fertility of his thinking and writing across many decades that we continue to find food for our own thinking and writing in the whole span of his philosophical works, from his books on the imagination to his reflections on Marxism, as this issue of Sartre Studies International exemplifies. And in a year in which we seem to have rediscovered the value of dialogue with others, many of the contributions to this issue exemplify that value as well: we see here Sartre in dialogue with Husserl, with Beauvoir, with Badiou, and with Lacan.

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Editorial

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

Imagination and the imaginary, both in life and in Sartre's treatment of these phenomena, seem so wide-ranging that it is hard to find your feet—what is in common between imagining the absent Pierre's face and imagining something never before seen? What role does imagination play in seeing someone in a portrait of them? What about in seeing Chevalier in Franconnay's imitation (or ‘performative simulation’) of him? Elad Magomedov's question is even trickier: how do we navigate the similarities and differences between Franconnay's Chevalier, Sartre's waiter's ‘playing at being a waiter’, and Jean-Claude Romand, ‘the “real” impostor who for fifteen years pretended to be a medical professional and ended up killing his entire family’?

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Editorial, SSI Summer 2023

John Gillespie and Katherine Morris

There is a great deal in this issue for serious Sartre scholars. Without initially intending to, we have put together an issue focussing on translation: a translation of Grégory Cormann's article that first appeared in 2021 in Études sartriennes 25 (‘Autour du mémoire sur l'image (1927)’), and one of Sartre's 1947 presentation to the Société Française de Philosophie, ‘Conscience de soi et connaissance de soi’ (‘Self-Awareness and Self-Knowledge’). We hope that these translations will make this material more available to a wider audience.

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Editorial

Thinking with Sartre

Edited by John H. Gillespie and Sarah Richmond