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A Game of Whac-A-Mole

The BDS Movement and Its Fluidity across International Political Opportunity Structures

Naama Lutz

Abstract

This article focuses on the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement's utilization of ‘fluidity,’ conceptualized as the ability to adapt campaign tactics to multiple arenas and political opportunity structures simultaneously. Framing BDS as both a social movement and a transnational advocacy network, it demonstrates the movement's fluidity in the context of three campaigns: the campaign at the 65th FIFA (Federation Internationale de Football Association) congress in 2015, which illustrates an ‘outsider’ strategy aimed at intergovernmental institutions; the 2014 Olive Declaration of municipalities endorsing BDS, which illustrates how local ‘insider’ campaigns can combine to create a translocal campaign; and the ‘Ferguson-Gaza moment’ in 2014, which illustrates how movements can engage at the level of civil society and embed themselves in the broader global justice movement.

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Editor's Note

The positive feedback we have received since the appearance of the first issue of the (renamed) Israel Studies Review last May has exceeded our expectations, and we are grateful to everyone who responded. Of course, we have built on the work of the previous Editorial Board and the support of the Association for Israel Studies. We are appreciative that the innovations we introduced, including the Forum section and the review essays of books published in a particular field in Hebrew, have received such approbation. We encourage all of our readers and friends to continue sending us more ideas for topics, sections, and issues to deal with.

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New Age Culture in Israel

Rachel Werczberger and Boaz Huss

On 17 June 2014, in the heart of the Etzion Bloc (Gush Etzion) in the West Bank, the site of the abduction of three Israeli teens by Palestinian terrorists the week before, an unusual event took place. Several Jewish-Israeli and Palestinian peace activists, a few rabbis, and a Muslim Sufi sheikh gathered in order to pray for the safe return of the kidnapped youths. The group prayed both in Hebrew and Arabic, reciting psalms and Quran-based Muslim prayers. “Our hearts are torn at this moment, and my heart goes out the mothers of these children,” said Sheikh Ibrahim Abu Al-Hawa, before reciting the first chapter of the Quran, the Fatiha. He continued, “There is a wall between our two nations, and we hope to remove the wall separating the hearts of humans” (Miller 2014). He concluded his speech by proclaiming “God is One” in Arabic and Hebrew, followed by the young Rabbi Yossi Froman (son of the late Rabbi Menachem Froman), who stood beside him.

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Introduction

Colin Shindler

education from Iberia to Siberia. Historically, the components of contemporary Israel Studies in essence began to be taught in Europe after World War I due to the emergence of the modern Zionist movement and the advent of Modern Hebrew as a spoken language

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Editors’ Note

Yoram Peri and Paul L. Scham

Hebrew literature into other languages, from 1948 to the present. Yael Halevi-Wise and Madeleine Gottesman examine the implications of translating the literature of a language that is ‘small’ by world standards but whose modern literature necessarily

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Editors’ Note

The Editors

(secular) right and another that comments on the English translation of Hillel Cohen’s Year Zero of the Israeli-Arab Conflict: 1929 ( Tarpat in Hebrew), which created quite a stir in Israel when it was originally published. We also review a new book on

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Editors’ Note

The Editors

also break an ISR tradition in the process. To date, ISR has reviewed only books in English, but this time we include a book in Hebrew: Uri Ram’s study of Martin Buber’s impact on Israeli society, on which we are publishing two reviews that present

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Editors’ Note

’s literature through the books of Devorah Omer: the NILI espionage group during World War I and the story of Itamar Ben-Avi, the first native speaker of modern Hebrew. Shikhmanter weaves together politics and differing historical narratives to show how Omer

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Editors' Note and In Memoriam: Rachel Feldhay Brenner

Paul L. Scham and Yoram Peri

devotion, her warmth, and, though she would deny it, for her leadership. Born in Zabrze, Poland, Brenner moved to Israel with her family in 1956. She studied at the Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, and the University of York in Toronto before

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Editors’ Note

Slouching toward Armageddon

, Israeli Peacemaking Since 1967) , and more, including one book as yet published only in Hebrew, Nissim Leon’s The Turban and the Flag: Nationalism versus Mizrahi Ultra-Orthodoxy . We earnestly hope that none of the dire scenarios implied or foreseen in