Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 303 items for :

  • "NATIONALISM" x
  • Refine by Access: My content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Bryonny Goodwin-Hawkins

became epidemiological nationalism. In this essay, I trace epidemiology's conscription in nationalist inscription. I invoke ‘nationalism’ without the presumption that the term always already entails a regressive politics. (Plaid Cymru – the dominant

Full access

Veiled Strangers

Rabindranath Tagore's America, in Letters and Lectures

Amardeep Singh

The Indian writer Rabindranath Tagore visited the United States several times, though his second trip in 1916-1917 seems to have generated the most excitement. On the verge of American entry into World War I, the Nobel prize-winning writer embarked on an extensive lecture tour critiquing the excesses of nationalism and imperialism. The visit generated a number of remarkable texts, including a series of important letters to family and friends written on the trip and the four long lectures collected and published in 1917 as Nationalism. I argue that the lectures on “Nationalism,” can and should be read as a form of “reverse Orientalist” travel writing, where Tagore aimed to show Americans how their own political and economic system could be seen as rather similar to the European powers. Tagore uses the lectures to develop a series of metaphors for the modern, instrumentalist deployment of power in the nation-state and the colonial world, against which he posited an ideal of modern man cultivated and “perfected,” rather like a work of art.

Full access

Richard Wright and the 1955 Bandung Conference

A Re-Evaluation of The Color Curtain

Babacar M'Baye

The Color Curtain reflects Richard Wright's problematical assessment of the 1955 Bandung Conference and his difficult attempts to reconcile his sincere denunciation of the consequences of colonialism and racism on people of Asian and African descent with his condescending representation of Third World nationalism during the middle of the twentieth century. The book reveals striking paradoxes in Wright's evaluation of a nationalism that he occasionally vilifies as an ideology that was grounded on impassioned and essentialist cultural or religious affiliations and feelings. Yet Wright's demeaning, elitist, and patronizing attitudes about Third World nationalism and cultures did not prevent him from identifying with the core spirit of the Bandung Conference. In his assessment of the summit, Wright occasionally reveals his admiration for a Third World nationalism that echoed his disparagement of Western racism and imperialism.

Free access

Petra Rethmann

Open access

Promising pipelines and hydrocarbon nationalism

The sociality of unbuilt infrastructure in indigenous Siberia

Gertjan Plets

By analysing how shamanist nomads who previously opposed large infrastructure works have suddenly become enchanted by the prospect of the construction of a large gas pipeline, this paper ethnographically investigates how technology and infrastructure become perceived as promising by ordinary people on the ground in post‐Soviet Siberia. Drawing attention to the discursive impact of large gas corporations and the role of deeply embedded Soviet conceptions of modernity in filling pipelines with cultural meaning, this paper provides unique insights into the highly localised engagements with infrastructure. As such, this paper contributes to the anthropology of Russia, where infrastructure has only recently received academic attention. It also corresponds to the ‘infrastructural turn’ in anthropology by studying the social, cultural and material conditions ensuring that infrastructure becomes perceived as promising. Furthermore, this paper explores the significant impact of ancillary infrastructures connected to a construction project in entangling people with technology and infrastructure.

Open access

Between Transnational Cooperation and Nationalism

The Little Entente of Women in Czechoslovakia

Gabriela Dudeková Kováčová

Focusing on the involvement of feminist activist women from Czechoslovakia in the Little Entente of Women (LEW), this article examines the ideological and political limits of transnational cooperation within such an international organization, one that aimed to promote women’s rights and pacifism in Central and Eastern Europe. The case of Czechoslovakia suggests that deep, ideological divisions between liberal feminist and conservative nationalist threads within the LEW’s national branch seriously undermined eff orts at unity and “global sisterhood” on the international level. It became possible to overcome ideological and political differences in the 1920s without questioning the very existence of the LEW. However, the antirevisionist political agenda of states involved in the LEW was a decisive factor in its reorganization. This article characterizes the rather limited impact of the LEW’s activities in Czechoslovakia and presents new details on its reorganization in the 1930s.

Free access

Beyond ethnographic populisms and performative nationalisms

Notes on the anthropology of the far right

Sean T. Mitchell

Open access

Erasing the Nation

The Historiography of African Nationalism in Conqueror South Africa

Terblanche Delport

conquest. In this article, we will specifically focus on the interpretations of African Nationalism by select proponents of the liberal and Marxist historiographic traditions. We will critique the way in which these historiographies depict and

Open access

An Obstacle to Decolonising Europe

White Nationalism and Its Co-option of Serbian Propaganda

Jordan Kiper

nationalism. As with neonationalism more broadly, white nationalism, in its contemporary form, has hybridised across digital networks in former colonising powers, thus alarming human rights groups. For instance, Antonio Guterres, the UN Secretary

Open access

Viral Intimacy and Catholic Nationalist Political Economy

Covid-19 and the Community Response in Rural Ireland

David Whyte

COVID-19 and the response of the community development sector in the Republic of Ireland have uncovered the legacy of Catholic nationalism in Irish capitalism. On the 27 March 2020, the full extent of the COVID-19 lockdown measures was announced