Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • Regional Studies x
  • Refine by Access: My content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Raili Marling

, national, and class norms. In addition to providing fresh insights into the case of Wasilewska, Mrozik also shows the mechanisms involved in shaping historical narratives about controversial historical actors. Emily R. Gioielli’s “‘Home Is Home No Longer

Free access

Francisca de Haan

ordinary women are among the least known subjects of Ottoman Turkish historiography, which she attributes to conventional and feminist historiography’s prioritizing of the elite and middle classes rather than poor and working-class women, as well as the way

Open access

Enriketa Papa-Pandelejmoni

, despite the fact that Romani and Egyptian ethnic minorities were not persecuted politically as a class, because socialism was the dictatorship of the proletariat regardless of gender and ethnicity (110). Life under communism, as archaeologist Professor

Open access

It's Complicated

The History of Sexuality in Eastern Europe Flourishes

Maria Bucur

experience and understanding of many other sociocultural norms and practices, from religion to ethnicity, race, class, able-bodiedness, and gender. We understand better how a stance considered progressive in one context can have toxic meaning in another

Free access

Feminine Feminist

Şirin Tekeli

Ceylân Orhun

took classes. But she was a perfectionist and did not pursue painting. Her knowledge of history of painters and the genres she liked was equal to watching a documentary. She was an avid music listener and music lover: her wide choice of repertoire would

Open access

Maria Bucur

many more lower-class inhabitants, vis-à-vis the ethnic Hungarians, Austrians, and Germans living in areas that later became part of Romania. The Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, which compounded the military losses suffered by the Romanian army during

Open access

Zuzanna Kołodziejska-Smagała

had died. 14 Therefore, leaving one's community meant something different for a Jew and for a non-Jew. Bujwidowa's review presents a secular, middle-class perspective, and although Kallas and other Polish-Jewish female writers belonged to that class

Open access

Maria Bucur, Katerina Dalakoura, Krassimira Daskalova, and Gabriela Dudeková Kováčová

Sofia Nădejde, were not invited to participate in discussions about changes in policies with regard to working-class women. Meanwhile, Greek and Bulgarian feminist organizations, despite their differing political associations, collaborated to a certain

Open access

Birgitta Bader-Zaar, Evguenia Davidova, Minja Bujaković, Milena Kirova, Malgorzata Fidelis, Stefano Petrungaro, Alexandra Talavar, Daniela Koleva, Rochelle Ruthchild, Vania Ivanova, Valentina Mitkova, Roxana L. Cazan, Sylwia Kuźma-Markowska, and Nadia Danova

feminist socialists more. Specifically, the history of non-elite women, of “peasant women, poor women, working-class women, women from ethnic minorities” 11 —an intersectional perspective—needs to be included. Notes 1 Maria Bucur and Krassimira

Open access

Marina Soroka

ceased to be their husbands’ helpmeets and joined the working classes. This article draws on the personal and official correspondence of diplomats and their wives, as well as their memoirs and a novel written by one of the women. The letters reproduce